Welcome to the archived web site of
Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. Psychologist (1950-2013)
California License No. PSY 10092
 
Specializing in Presence-Centered Therapy
balancing mind and heart, body and spirit

Now in memoriam - This website is no longer being updated

 


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Resource Link Catagories:

People Skills, Memory, Sleep, Intimacy / Sexuality & Pornography


 People Skills / Relationship building & Self-Esteem | Memory & Brain Exercises | Sleep | Sexuality / Intimacy | Pornography

Transforming Unhealthy Behavioral Patterns

Abusive-Neurotic / Drama Triangle: Roles of Victim, Rescuer and Punisher (and ultimate roles of Martyr, Messiah and Predator): First described by Stephen Karpman in a 1968 article "Fairy Tales and Script Drama Analysis", what he calls the "drama triangle" is a psychological and social model of human interaction in transactional analysis (TA). The model states that three habitual psychological roles which people often take in a situation are: 1) Victim—the person who is treated as or accepts the role of a victim; 2) Persecutor—the person who pressures, coerces or persecutes the victim; and 3) Rescuer—the one who intervenes out of an ostensible wish to help the situation or the underdog. Typically if someone plays one role, they play them all at various times, although it is likely that one has their preferred or habitual role. The three roles in this abusive-neurotic triangle lack functionality, have no real power and do not constitute anything resembling a healthy life of interpersonal relationships. The opportunity for anyone acting out any of these roles is to wake up to the extremely painful emotional and relational costs, see the wounded ego acting these roles out and their roots in past conditioning, and begin to grow past acting out any of these roles while maturing and building strong internal resources and a deepening capacity to bear strong emotions.
therapyideas.net/triangles.htm
mental-health-today.com/articles/drama.htm
counsellingcentral.com/transactional-analysis-drama-triangle-of-rescuer-persecutor-and-victim/
robinjelliott.com...victim-rescuer-persecutor...80...and-the-way-out-of-this-tragic-triangle~
co-cornucopia.org.uk/coco/articles/Rescue3/reschand.htm
holisticworld.co.uk/your_say.php?article_id=77
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karpman_drama_triangle

Perfectionism can work for you or work you over!—Adaptive and Maladaptive Perfectionists: Researchers are finding that there are many types of perfectionism, each with its own set of problems. Several links below offer many highly practical ideas, approaches and strategies to transform unhealthy maladaptive perfectionism into healthy adaptive perfectionism.
nytimes.com/2007/12/04/health/04mind.html
apa.org/monitor/nov03/manyfaces.aspx
stateuniversity.com/blog/permalink/Is-Perfectionism-Getting-In-the-Way-of-Your-Success-.html
nscblog.com/miscellaneous/the-adaptive-perfectionist/
juliannebodytemple.blogspot.com/2011/05/adaptive-perfectionism.html
domspe.org/only_child/article5.html
roosevelttorch.com/sections/features/research-examines-perfectionism-1.2500184
sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886901002021
celestinechua.com/blog/10-ways-to-tell-if-you-are-a-perfectionist/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfectionism_%28psychology%29
psychologytoday.com/articles/200802/pitfalls-perfectionism
livestrong.com/article/14702-overcoming-perfectionism/
wikihow.com/Control-Perfectionism
celestinechua.com/blog/overcoming-perfectionism-in-8-steps/
psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2009/05/11/10-steps-to-conquer-perfectionism/
blogs.hbr.org/bregman/2009/09/how-to-escape-perfectionism.html

On this subject, you can peruse Dr. Friedman's article "The Three Meanings of "Perfect": Perfectible is Workable—Perfectionism Isn't" willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articStratCPF-Perfect.html

Recognize Manipulation, Passive-Aggressive Behaviors, Impression Management and People Pleasing (and How to "Buy Out" of each as a false front!): Consider knowing the difference between passive behavior, aggressive behavior, passive-aggressive behavior and assertive behavior.
squidoo.com/passive-aggressive-assertive
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_manipulation
rickross.com/reference/brainwashing/brainwashing11.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive%E2%80%93aggressive_behavior
nytimes.com/2004/11/16/health/psychology/16pass.html
med.nyu.edu/content?ChunkIID=96685
emotionalcompetency.com/pa.htm
straightdope.com/columns/read/2453/what-is-passive-aggressive
eastbaycouples.com/blog/passiveaggressive-behaviors/
psychologytoday.com/blog/passive-aggressive-diaries/200910/passive-aggressive-behavior-in-the-workplace-exposing-office-
wikihow.com/Stop-Passive-Aggressive-Behavior-in-the-Workplace
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impression_management
psychwiki.com/wiki/Impression_Management
ocw.nd.edu/sociology/introduction-to-social-psychology/lectures/class-impression-management
livestrong.com/article/14669-people-pleasing-personality/
psychologytoday.com/articles/200805/field-guide-the-people-pleaser-may-i-serve-your-doormat
theenhancelife.com/2008/10/people-pleasing-price-of-being-too-nice.html
motivatethyself.com/overcoming-people-pleasing/
psychcentral.com/lib/2011/21-tips-to-stop-being-a-people-pleaser/
sixwise.com/newsletters/06/05/24/how-to-break-free-from-the-self-sabotaging-people-pleasing-habits-in-your-relationships.htm

On this subject, you can peruse Dr. Friedman's articles:
"Developing An inner Meter on Manipulation—A Critical Life Skill"
     willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articToolsFTC-Manip.html,
"An Inventory of Passive-Aggressive Behaviors"

     willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articToolsFTC-Passive.html
and
"Setting Healthy Limits—It Can Be An All-Win!
     willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articToolsFTC-Limits.html

Choking or panicking?—Why some people choke and others panic: The art of failure—Malcolm Galdwell, popular author and writer for The New Yorker magazine, wrote two columns he entitles "The Art of Failure" in late August 2000 that offered clear examples from sports and a newsworthy event to highlight the difference between choking and panicking. Other writers comment on this difference. This is a key distinction and a crucial one for choosing the most effective intervention strategy for each! Enjoy his other columns under the heading of "The New Yorker Archive. Recommended.
gladwell.com/2000/2000_08_21_a_choking.html
fijidailypost.com/editorial.php?date=20100205
wisdencricketer.com/blogs/blog/2010/01/06/lawrence-booth-pakistan-crickets-latest-victims-of-choking-phenomenon/
chess.com/article/view/on-botvinnik-choking-and-superstar-pressure
inforgood.wordpress.com/2010/01/08/checklists-observations-and-the-art-of-failure/
cameronstrachan.com/golf-instruction/how-to-stop-choking-on-the-golf-course/
philoye.com/musings/cat_baseball.shtml
cardplayer.com...harrison-gimbel-23-4/articles/19101-the-art-of-failure~
indysmallbiz.com/2010/02/the-difference-between-choking-and-panicking-in-business/
vaguevagaries.blogspot.com/2010/04/distinguishing-between-choking-and.html
drputt.com/deardrputt/Nerves.htm
scienceblogs.com/cortex/2009/07/choking.php
nytimes.com/2009/10/20/books/20gladwell.html

Gossip, often negative, undercutting and malicious, usually is not good for any living thing—but there are exceptions: With the exceptions of gossip that informs, opens up options or teaches something useful, consider the policy of not listening to or indulging in malicious gossip since it brings everyone and everything down, down, down. Bernard Baruch once said, "Two things are bad for the heart—running up stairs and running down people." Consider the Buddhist article "7 Tips for Giving Up Gossip" from Tricycle magazine. This is a controversial topic given how gossip can be positive or negative, helpful or hurtful. So judge for yourself.
nytimes.com/2009/11/03/science/03tier.html?_r=1&th&emc=th
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gossip
selfhelpmagazine.com/article/gossip
59seconds.wordpress.com/2009/07/06/in-59-seconds-beware-of-gossip
searchwarp.com...A-Two-Pronged-Look-At-Two-Faced-Talk~
people.howstuffworks.com/gossip.htm/printable
apa.org/monitor/apr06/latest.html
psychologytoday.com...darling-do-you-think-we-should-gossip~
knox.edu/x20149.xml
serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/3375
lukeford.net/Dennis/indexp271.html
usatoday.com/tech/science/discoveries/2006-09-18-research-gossip_x.htm
apa.org/science/psa/apr05gossip.html
tricycle.com/-practice/the-truth-about-gossip?page=0,2

Relationship building & Self-Esteem

The art of win-win negotiation is the art of relationship-building: All of life is fundamentally a negotiation and all works by mutual agreement through relationship-building. It occurs in the private arena such as in dating, cohabitating, marriage, divorce, parenting and throughout everyday life as well as in the public arena in business, non-profits, government, legal proceedings, among nations, war and peace. Think of negotiation as a conversation or dialogue that aims to define and resolve disputes, craft results that satisfy many interests, bargain for individual and collective advantage, and produce an agreement upon courses of action. There are many negotiating styles and approaches that at root all revolve around relationship-building. While win-loss interactions typically degenerate to lose-lose interactions, win-win interactions clearly are not the same and are well worth deeper investigation. Some would say that the only game worth playing is a win-win.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negotiation
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negotiation_theory
beyondintractability.org/essay/negotiation
colorado.edu/conflict/peace/treatment/pricneg.htm
ezinearticles.com/?cat=Business:Negotiation
mftrou.com/win-win-negotiation.html
articlesbase.com/negotiation-articles/5-quick-steps-to-winwin-negotiation~
everyonenegotiates.com/negotiation/negotiatingwinwinarticle.htm
mindtools.com/CommSkll/NegotiationSkills.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Win-win_game

Emotional Intelligence (EQ): EQ is a separate trait from leadership qualities studies show: A September 2010 study concludes "The study adds to evidence that emotional intelligence is a separate trait from other leadership qualities such as having cognitive intelligence and being cooperative, open to ideas, and conscientious." At the same time, the ability to understand emotions is a key ingredient in people who become leaders in groups with no formal authority. For leaders to be leaders it is about being able to process other people's emotions. Several links offer articles and videos to introduce the key concepts and tools of emotional intelligence as well as sharpen what EQ you have. In January 2011 Researchers found that EQ peaks in your 60's. Several links offer articles and videos to introduce the key concepts and tools of emotional intelligence as well as sharpen what EQ you have.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100921101509.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence
danielgoleman.info/topics/emotional-intelligence
psychcentral.com/lib/2007/what-is-emotional-intelligence-eq
helpguide.org/mental/eq5_raising_emotional_intelligence.htm
emotionalintelligencecentral.org
psychology.about.com...personalitydevelopment/a/emotionalintell~
businessballs.com/eq.htm
telegraph.co.uk...Emotional-intelligence-peaks-in-your-60s~

Emotion recognition capabilities on computers: Two High School students—Matthew Fernandez and Akash Krishnan—in Portland, Oregon were winners of the team competition in December 2010 of the Siemens Competition in Washington, D.C., one of the two premier science competitions in the nation that cam with $100,000 in scholarship money for their work on emotion recognition capabilities on computers. The algorithm they built allows them to determine the speaker's emotion by measuring 57 different features of an audio signal against a prerecorded signal that is already defined by a human listener as a feeling or emotion, like being angry, happy or sad. The two look forward to working on a chip that provides emotion-recognition capabilities to a range of devices like cellphones and onboard life monitoring systems of computers on spacecraft. Excerpt: “Emotion is innately meta information,” Matt says, “and that’s why it’s a real challenge. A lot of people base their algorithms off of speech-recognition systems because those have been established. But emotion is a really different task, and it’s a different goal.” For one, in speech recognition, sequence is essential; get the sounds out of order, and you mess up the words. In emotion recognition, the order isn’t nearly as important as various measures of energy and pitch."
nytimes.com/2011/03/27/magazine/mag-27science~

Communitarianism is investing time and energy in relations with others and service to the common good—A political and philosophical theory: Communitarianism is proposed by some writers and philosophers as an alternative to consumerism. While consumption can be understood as attention to satisfying basic human needs such as safety, food, shelter, clothing, health care and education, this is far different than consumerism or acquiring goods and services to satisfy higher needs (using Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs) such as self-esteem and self-actualization, which is anything but healthy. Several links offer articles that explore these dynamics.
slate.com/id/2380
utne.com/Spirituality/Get-Rich-Now-Economic-Crisis-Community.aspx
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communitarianism
wordiq.com/definition/Communitarianism
infed.org/biblio/communitarianism.htm
debate.uvm.edu/handbookfile/pubpriv/046.html
fs.huntingdon.edu/jlewis/syl/IRcomp/303WrightComunitrnV2.htm
web.missouri.edu/~johnsonrn/comm.html
infed.org/biblio/communitarianism.htm
plato.stanford.edu/entries/communitarianism/

Empathy—More privilege means less empathy: Upper-class people less able to read others' emotions, while lower-class people are more accurate in making inferences about emotions—A November 2010 study in Psychological Science shared the results of three studies showed that lower-class individuals (compared with upper-class people) received higher scores on a test of empathic accuracy, judged the emotions of an interaction partner more accurately, and made more accurate inferences about emotion from static images of muscle movements in the eyes. An except: "Moreover, the association between social class and empathic accuracy was explained by the tendency for lower-class individuals to explain social events in terms of features of the external environment." In other words, upper-class people have trouble recognizing the emotions other people are feeling. The researchers speculate that because upper-class people can solve their problems without relying on others, they are less dependent on the people around them. It appears to be the social / cultural context that makes the difference and that stereotypes about the classes simply are incorrect.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101122172008.htm
bigthink.com/ideas/25077
pss.sagepub.com/content/21/11/1716.abstract

Original article: docs.google.com...Social+Class,+Contextualism,+and+Empathic+Accuracy~

Empathy and Perspective Taking: Feeling with another is a high-level feeling skills well worth developing and refuse to manipulatively misuse—Research findings from June 2011 reveal that empathic responses are rare, fragile and "easy to disrupt the pattern from perception of suffering to motivation to alleviate the suffering with actual helping." Recent interdisciplinary research shows that outgroup members' suffering evokes dampened empathic responses as compared to ingroup members' suffering, with speculations offered to account for this phenomenon. Other links explore this important topic, including perspective taking as well as the distinction between empathy and sympathy.
westallen.typepad.com/idealawg/2011/05/us-and-them-intergroup-failures-of-empathy.html
diffen.com/difference/Empathy_vs_Sympathy
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empathy
socialthinking.com/what-is-social-thinking/four-steps-of-perspective-taking
mediate.com/articles/rundeC3.cfm

Also peruse Dr. Friedman's article "Compassion Is Healing—Empathy is "Perspective Taking"
willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articToolsFTC-Compassion.html

Self-esteem—The three varieties of "Arrogant", "Genuine" or "Implicit" Self-Esteem: False equanimity or phony self-esteem matches criminals who tend to fit both anti-social personality disorder (psychopaths/sociopaths) and narcissistic personality disorder in having a high opinion of themselves and believe others admire them, yet this house of cards is mainly in their own minds and not based on earned and honorable accomplishments—"Arrogant" self-esteem. Feeling good about yourself based on a realistic assessment of qualities within you (implicit self-esteem) is different than feeling good about yourself based on merited accomplishments, social/occupational success and good health (genuine self-esteem). Author and psychiatrist M. Scott Peck, M.D. explored the difference between Self-Love and Self-Esteem in his 1993 book Further Along the Road Less Traveled (in the link below, consider reading Chapter 5 "Self-Love versus Self-Esteem", pages 87 to 89 are especially recommended). Explore research that seems to imply that genuine and implicit self-esteem are a byproduct of healthy maturation and development. Further, it is implied that aiming to promote or instill self-esteem may well be misguided in undercutting incentive for self-growth and encouraging self-centeredness. Research in the April 2010 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, found that on the average self-esteem rises steadily as people age and starts declining around the time of retirement. Specifically, findings showed that on the average self-esteem was lowest among young adults, increased throughout adulthood peaking at age 60, and declined thereafter. Again, come to your own view.
harvardmagazine.com/2005/09/self-esteem-real-and-pho.html
goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/gi_0199-6558440/The-use-and-misuse-of.html
mayoclinic.com/health/self-esteem/MH00128
ezinearticles.com---Types-of-and-Impacts-on-Self-Esteem~
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-esteem~
psychwiki.com/wiki/High_Self-esteem:_Secure_v._Fragile
macses.ucsf.edu/Research/Psychosocial/notebook/selfesteem.html
books.google.com...self-love+and+self-esteem~
apa.org/news/press/releases/2010/03/self-esteem.aspx


 People Skills / Relationship building & Self-Esteem | Memory & Brain Exercises | Sleep | Sexuality / Intimacy | Pornography

Memory and Brain Exercises

Memory: A February 2011 New York Times article "Secrets of a Mind-Gamer" looks at how you can train your brain and be a world-class memory athlete by using a variety of mnemonic systems, including using a code to convert digits into sounds and creating memorable images for information and storing them in architectural spaces like modern designed buildings and elaborate palaces. An excerpt: "For all of our griping over the everyday failings of our memories—the misplaced keys, the forgotten name, the factoid stuck on the the tongue—our biggest failing may be that we forget how rarely we forget. The point of the memory techniques described in "Rhetorica ad Herennium" ["...a short Latin rhetorical textbook...written sometime between 86 and 82 B.C."] is to take the kinds of memories our brains aren't that good at holding onto and transform them into the kinds of memories our brains were built for. It advises creating memorable images for your palaces: the funnier, lewder and more bizarre, the better. "When we see in everyday life things that are petty, ordinary and banal, we generally fail to remember them....But if we see or hear something exceptionally base, dishonorable, extraordinary, great, unbelievable or laughable, that we are likely to remember for a long time." This sounds no different than my regular and long-standing interest in the use of extreme examples to illustrate important points in therapy so clients will have a much easier time remembering them and a much harder time forgetting them. Other links explore immediate, sensory, short-term, long-term, working, autobiographical, explicit and implicit memory, how to improve your memory, various mnemonic approaches and what is normal and what is not with memory loss in aging.
nytimes.com/interactive/2011/02/20/magazine/mind-secrets.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory
positscience.com/human-brain/memory/types-of-memory
cc.gatech.edu/classes/cs6751_97_winter/Topics/human-cap/memory~
webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/memory.html
nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/memory.html
familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/seniors/common-older/124.html
kidshealth.org/kid/health_problems/brain/memory.html
psychologytoday.com/basics/memory
livescience.com/topics/memory/
mindtools.com/memory.html
vcld.org/pages/newsletters/00_01_fall/mnemonic.htm
education.com/reference/article/mnemonic-strategies-and-techniques/
memory-key.com/improving/strategies/advanced/mnemonics
frank.mtsu.edu/~studskl/mem.html
studygs.net/memory/
thememorypage.net/
supermemo.com/

Earliest childhood recollections / memories can go back before age 2, but are fragile and can fade by age 10. Canadian reseachers in May 2011 demonstrated that some young children can remember events from even before age 2, yet those memories are fragile and many vanish by about age 10. The inability to remember the earliest years of childhood, called infantile anmesia, has been an area of some speculation for a long time. An excerpt: "Modern researchers think that storing and retrieving memories require language skills that don't develop until age 3 or 4. Others believe that while children can recall fragments of scenes from early life, they can't create autobiographical memories—the episodes that make up one's life story—until they have a firm concept of "self," which may take a few more years."
online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304520804576341482658082052.html~

Our Irrational Fear of Forgetting: A May 2011 New York Times article with this title explores the irrational fear of forgetting, especially in the context of people over age 55 dread getting Alzheimer's more than any other disease as found in a 2010 survey and the fact that only 1 in 8 Americans older than 65 get Alzheimer's simply doesn't register. The article is reassuring in its claim that most forgetfulness is not Alzheimer's, or dementia, or even necessarily a sign of cognitive impairment. It ends on the note of looking forward with a positive perspective instead of despair.
nytimes.com/2011/05/22/opinion/22gullette.html?ref=opinion

The Middle-Aged brain/mind maintains many of the abilities of youth and acquires some new ones—The middle-aged mind is calmer, less neurotic and better able to sort through social situations. Some middle-agers have improved cognitive abilities as well. In the April 2011 article in the American Psychological Association's Monitor on Psychology there is a summary of the findings concerning the middle-aged brain/mind. An excerpt: "While memorization skills and perceptual speed both start to decline in young adulthood, verbal abilities, spatial reasoning, simple math abilities and abstract reasoning skills all improve in middle age." Other links look at this issue along with ways the weed the garden of the mind in mid-life.
apa.org/monitor/2011/04/mind-midlife.aspx
ivillage.com/emotional-maturity-doesn-t-come-until-mid-life/4-a-308711
dailymail.co.uk/health...The-midlife-brain-surge-means-DO-grow-wiser-older.html
ezinearticles...Dont-Believe-Everything-You-Say,-Your-Midlife-Brain-Will-Thank-You~
cwhn.ca/resources/afi/cognitive.html
care2.com/greenliving/relating-with-the-mid-life-mind.html#
menopause.org/MFnegativebehaviors.aspx
helpformidlifecrisis.com/tending-the-garden-of-the-midlife-mind.html

Brain exercises help build the brain and grow the mind: Whether mechanisms of cognition that differentiate a less evolved brain from a smart one, all to boost cognitive capacity and/or not lose/retain cognitive abilities, is called "neuro-slumming" or "brain training" or "cognitive enhancement," there is no lack of advice offered. In recent years research into developing our brains / minds have been a vital and expanding area of interest. In January 2011 Newsweek ran a cover article on this very subject. Apparently whatever mechanism that helps increase one's confidence and motivation can enhance creative problem-solving. Excerpts: "One of the strongest findings in neuroplasticity, the science of how the brain changes its structure and function in response to input, is that attention is almost magical in its ability to physically alter the brain and enlarge functional circuits." and "In other words, identical input—tactile sensations and sounds—produces a different result, expanding a brain area or not, depending only on whether attention is being paid." Furthermore, research is showing that a great deal of cognitive training boost mental prowess with the crucial caveat that training your memory, reasoning, or speed of processing improves that skill, yet does not generally transfer to other tasks. So a key to brain training is finding something that does transfer. At present, research is finding that three excellent candidates for brain training that does transfer to other activities/tasks are physical exercise such as the simple aerobic/cardio exercise such as walking 45 minutes three times a week, meditation, and some videogames. Other links flesh out the domain, including how to build a baby's brain, brain training games, and mind building games for seniors.
newsweek.com/2011/01/03/can-you-build-a-better-brain.html
fi.edu/learn/brain/exercise.html
articlesnatch.com/Article/Popular-Brain-Building-Games-Excite-Your-Mind~
mindpowernews.com/BrainPower.htm
quantum-self.com/tag/brain-gym
parade.com/games/lumosity/index.html
ehow.com/list_5926045_mind-building-games.html
ehow.com/list_5827476_mind-building-games-seniors.html
juggernart.com/games/free-online-puzzle-games/brain-puzzle-mind-games-2~
shockwave.com/online/special/brain-games.jsp
articleclick.com/Article/Mind-Puzzles-Building-the-Brain/930480
newsweek.com/1997/02/28/how-to-build-a-baby-s-brain.html

Different languages influence our minds in different ways recent research shows—Benjamin Lee Whorf's idea some 70 years ago that language's power to shape the mind by, specifically by constraining our minds and preventing us from being ale to think certain ideas, never had any supportive evidence. It was reformulated as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis and its strong version states that language determines thought and that linguistic categories limit and determine cognitive categories (also called "linguistic relativity"). More recent findings show that "language influences our minds not because our language allows us to think, but rather because it habitually obliges us to think about", according to an August New York Times Magazine article. As renowned linguist Roman Jakobson pointed out: "Languages differ essentially in what they must convey and not in what they may convey." Some illustrations cited include the differences between languages over what genders (masculine or feminine) assign an inanimate object, how space is described (egocentric coordinates or geographic directions), and how we perceive colors. Remarkable.
nytimes.com/2010/08/29/magazine/29language~
edge.org/3rd_culture/boroditsky09/boroditsky09_index.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_relativity

Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive consequences of having information at our fingertips / Is Google and being able to access information almost instantly gradually killing our memory power (use it or lose it)?---An excerpt from a July 2011 research article in the journal Science: "The article reports 4 studies which "suggest that when faced with difficult questions, people are primed to think about computers and that when people expect to have future access to information, they have lower rates of recall of the information itself and enhanced recall instead for where to access it. The Internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory, where information is stored collectively outside ourselves."
news.columbia.edu/research/2490
buzzom.com/2011/07/google-is-gradually-killing-our-memory-power-says-study/


 People Skills / Relationship building & Self-Esteem | Memory & Brain Exercises | Sleep | Sexuality / Intimacy | Pornography

Sleep, Sleep Cycles, Positions and Better Sleep

Sleep, sleep cycles, effect of drugs on sleep, sleep deprivation, sleep challenges, how much sleep is necessary at different ages, kid's sleep, and how to get a good night's sleep (sleep hygiene)—Since a third of life is spent in some form of rest or sleep and no one feels like themselves and can perform well without a adequate sleep, sleep is vital to a well-lived, healthy life. When you do not give yourself appropriate sleep, your body will "take" rest through microsleep which can place your well-being and very life at risk. Peruse a wide variety of sleep topics, sleep-related problems, how sleep is viewed in American polls, and how to let sleep work for you at the website of the National Sleep Foundation. An estimated 20% or more adults suffer from some form of sleep deprivation, a common symptom of depression. Other links provide useful information about what impact sleep deprivation has on health, how much sleep is necessary at different ages, sleep disturbances, kid's sleep, and tips on how to obtain a fine night's sleep.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep
health.howstuffworks.com/sleep.htm
apa.org/topics/whysleep.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsleep
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_hygiene
sleepfoundation.org
sleepfoundation.org/article/hot-topics/let-sleep-work-you
medicinenet.com/sleep/article.htm
ninds.nih.gov/disorders/brain_basics/understanding_sleep.htm
kidshealth.org/parent/general/sleep/sleep.html
faculty.washington.edu/chudler/sleep.html
stanford.edu/~dement/howto.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_deprivation
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_Deprivation_(Cognitive_Performance)
sleepdex.org/deficit.htm

Research results released in the September 1, 2010 issue of Sleep showed that in a random sample of 5,000 young adults identified from 20,822 young adults, shorter sleep duration (less than 5 hours of sleep) had an increased risk for onset of psychological distress (three times higher risk of psychological distress than those with long sleep duration). Thus, self-reported sleep duration is linearly associated with prevalent and persistent psychological distress in young adults. A September 2010 article gives seven ways of getting back to sleep when work is on your mind: 1) keep pen and paper by the bed; 2) move to the sofa or another bed; 3) read something educational or spiritually nourishing; 4) listen to music; 5) meditate; 6) pray; and 7) just do it (the work).
news-medical.net...Short-sleep-duration-increases-risk-of-psychological-distress~
journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=27892
lawjobs.com/newsandviews/LawArticleFriendly.jsp~

A poll released in January 2011 found that nearly 58 percent of Canadians say they often feel tired, a sign of the country being sleep-deprived.
cbc.ca/health/story/2011/01/03/sleep-canada-weighs-in-poll.html

Sleep Positions: Which is the healthiest?—Best position by far is the back and next is on the side, then comes not ideal being the fetal position, and the worst is sleeping on your stomach, according to medical doctor Dr. Mercola who draws upon an April 2011 report on CNN.
articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/05/11/which-sleep-position-is-healthiest.aspx
cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/04/19/healthiest.sleep.position/index.html~

Biphasic Sleeping: Nocturnal awakenings? Middle-of-the-night insomnia? A Biphasic pattern of sleep may be the most natural sleep pattern, the dominant pattern of sleep since time immemorial and be beneficial, says Roger Ekirch, a sleep historian at Virginia Tech University—Sleeping in two hour blocks, separated by an hour or so period of wakefulness in the middle of the night is a pattern of which there are countless references (e.g., "first sleep" or "deep sleep" and "second sleep" or "morning sleep") in literature, legal depositions and other archival documents from pre-Industrial European times. Ekirch writes in his book At Day's Close: Night in Times Past (2005) that in the past, particularly during winter, darkness lasted up to 14 hours per night and that biphasic or segmented sleep patterns evolved to be very flexible, including taking several hours to get to sleep, to fill the long stretch of nighttime and still occurs for many people in undeveloped parts of the world. During the time between the four-hour phases, people would stay in bed, pray, talk with their spouse or think about their dreams. With the advent of electricity and Thomas Edison's lightbulb and the Industrial Revolution, this all changed and normal sleep forgoes the period of wakefulness used to break up the night so we sleep all in one 8-hour fell swoop. Ekirch sees modern humans as chronically sleep-deprived and cites the common pattern of taking only 15 minutes to fall asleep and doing our best not to wake up in the night. With no nothing to break up the night, people became more productive with the extended day given the use of lights and no longer spent time reviewing their dreams, something valued throughout the ages. Without having to jump up and get rolling upon awakening from the 8-hour sleep, people do not spent time accessing and processing their dreams. In essence people lose a pathway to their unconscious and the opportunity to decode and gain incredible value from their dream lives. He speculates that people who wake up in the night may be people with particularly strong circadian (daily) rhythms. In the 1990s Thomas Wehr, a sleep scientist, discovered that everyone sleeps biphasically (that is, taking two hours to fall to sleep, then sleeping in two four-hour phases separated by an hour of wakefulness) when subjected to natural patterns of light and dark. Other links explore a Biphasic pattern of sleep, such as findings showing that it refreshes the mind, how it can make you smarter, and how to go about switching to Biphasic Sleeping.
lifeslittlemysteries.com/bustin-the-8-hour-sleep-myth-1362/
lifeslittlemysteries.com/wehrs-biphasic-sleep-study-data-1363/
psychologytoday.com...how-biphasic-sleep-schedule-can-make-you-smarter~
...nationalpost.com...how-a-biphasic-sleep-schedule-can-make-leaders-smarter~
blifaloo.com/info/sleeppatterns.php
stevepavlina.com...switching-biphasic-sleeping-start-here~
medicalnewstoday.com/articles/179882.php
squidoo.com/biphasic

Cool your Head with a Cooling Cap to Help Fall Asleep: A research-supported tip for insomniacs and those with sleep challenges: An excerpt of psychiatrist's Dr. Daniel Buysse's June 2011 research findings at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine: "When Buysse's group gave 12 insomniacs a cap to wear that contained circulating water at cool temperatures, they were able to get them to fall asleep almost as easily as people without sleep disorders: using the caps, the insomniacs took about 13 minutes to fall asleep, compared with 16 minutes for the healthy controls, and they slept for 89% of the time they were in bed, which was similar to the amount of time the controls spent asleep."
healthland.time.com/2011/06/17/tip-for-insomniacs-cool-your-head-to-fall-asleep/
lifehacker.com/5813879/cant-sleep-cool-your-brain
wikihow.com/Sleep-Comfortably-on-a-Hot-Night
ehow.com/how_2177866_fall-asleep-faster.html

Turn on a blue light to be awake, alert, attentive and fight fatigue since the slumber producing hormone Melatonin (that regulates sleep) is suppressed, according to July 2011 study and previous findings: Help regulate your own sleep: expose yourself to blue light and herein limit production of melatonin and stay more awake; absent blue light and melatonin production rams up and we get sleepy. A related approach is to use blue-blocking glasses to improve sleep (and ADHD symptoms), according to November 2007 research findings.
marksdailyapple.com/how-light-affects-our-sleep/
fitsugar.com/Better-Sleep-Turn-Off-Blue-Light-2037593
articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/01/10/trouble-sleeping-caused-by-glowing-gadgets.aspx
sleep.med.harvard.edu/news/28/Blue+Light+May+Fight+Fatigue
sleepbetter.org/home/blue-light-causing-your-sleeping-blues/
metroword.com/thehuntressgathers/part-2-sleep-disorder-insomnia/
sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/11/071112143308.htm

Get less than six hours sleep per night and have a 48% increase in risk of a fatal heart attack (developing or dying from heart disease), and a 15% increased chance of having or dying of a stroke, according to a February 2011 meta-analysis of 15 other sleep studies following nearly 475,000 adults from eight countries including the United States, United Kingdom, japan, and Israel for seven to 25 years. Now here's an offer you can't refuse!
...cnn.com...late-nights-early-mornings-a-ticking-time-bomb-for-health~
times-series.co.uk/families/national/8843221.print
nhs.uk/news/2011/02February...sleep-patterns-predict-heart-attack-risk~
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK19961

Sleeping too little or sleeping too much are both associated with adverse cognitive effects, according to research findings: An April 2011 article in the journal Sleep showed that sleep is associated with cognitive function, specifically that women and men who sleep more OR less than 6 to 8 hours per night are subject to an accelerated cognitive decline in late middle age that is equivalent to four to seven years of aging. An excerpt: " ...firm evidence remained for an association between an increase from 7 or 8 h sleep and lower cognitive function for all tests, except memory, and between a decrease from 6-8 h sleep and poorer reasoning, vocabulary, and the MMSE (Mini Mental State Examination). The magnitude of these effects was equivalent to a 4-7 year increase in age." Researchers also found that in women sleep duration of 7 hours of sleep per night was associated with the highest score for every cognitive function, while among men cognitive function was similar for those who reported sleeping 6, 7 or 8 hours.
eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-05/aaos-aci042711.php
journalsleep.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=28123
medicalxpress.com...2011-05-adverse-duration-cognitive-scores-middle-aged~

Joseph Mercola, MD refers to the National Sleep Foundation's (NSF) 2010 "Sleep in America Poll" that found that 43% of Americans reported "rarely or never" getting a good night's sleep on weekdays, which he interprets this poor quality sleep and sleep deprivation as having far-reaching effects on weight as well as your physical, mental and emotional health and well-being.
articles.mercola.com...2011/06/01/16-things-you-didnt-know-about-sleep~
sleepfoundation.org...poll-reveals-sleep-differences-among-ethnic-groups~
NSF Sleep in America Poll - Summary of Findings.pdf

Snoring Causes and Remedies

Snoring: What causes it and what you can do about it—Snoring may be caused by being overweight, being in the last month of pregnancy, nasal congestion from colds of allergies, swelling of the soft palate of the mouth, swollen adenoids and tonsils, prominence of the area at the base of the tongue, and the use of sleeping pills, antihistamines, or alcohol at bedtime. Snoring remedies include losing weight, not sleeping on your back/sleeping on your side (or one side), avoiding alcohol before bed, clearing nasal passages, elevating your head, and using over-the-counter drug-free nasal strips that help widen the nostrils among many other usual and unusual ways to stop snoring. Snoring is a symptom that may be more than a nuisance; it can also be a danger sign. One possibility is a medical condition called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) which is estimated to affect 9 percent of men between the ages of 30 and 60. It is common in men who are overweight and in people with body fat in the neck area. Another possibility is that snoring and sleep problems could signal heart disease.
nytimes.com/2010/12/11/health/11patient.html
health.nytimes.com/health/guides/symptoms/snoring/overview~
antisnoring.org/anti-snoring-treatment-tips
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snoring
wiki.medpedia.com/Usual_and_Unusual_Ways_to_Stop_Snoring
medhelp.org...Usual-and-Unusual-Ways-to-Stop-Snoring~
boston.com.../snoring_not_just_a_nuisance_its_a_danger_sign~
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea
health.msn.com/blogs/second-opinions-post~
huffingtonpost.com/2010/12/09/snoring-and-sleep-problem~
articlesbase....snoring-bad-for-your-partner-and-bad-for-your-heart~
health.discovery.com/centers/mens/articles/snore.html

Snoring: Causes, natural lifestyle changes to address snoring, many other treatments and aids to stop snoring.
articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/12/11/9-ways-to-help-you-stop-snoring.aspx
parade.com/health/2010/05/16-the-end-of-snoring.html
webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/five-natural-remedies-to-stop-snoring
ehow.com/way_5290493_ways-stop-snoring.html
ririanproject.com/2007/11/24/soundless-sleep-10-ways-to-stop-snoring/
theadventurouswriter.com/...why-people-snore-plus-6-ways-to-stop-snoring~
sparkpeople.com/resource/wellness_articles.asp?id=853
waystostopsnoring.net/
health.howstuffworks.com/mental-health/sleep/basics/tips-to-stop-snoring.htm
healthguidance.org/entry/6087/1/How-To-Stop-Snoring-Naturally.html
consumersearch.com/snoring-remedies
ezinearticles.com/?Easy-Ways-To-Stop-Snoring&id=356388
sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/08/16/DDP81ERBM5.DTL


 People Skills / Relationship building & Self-Esteem | Memory & Brain Exercises | Sleep | Sexuality / Intimacy | Pornography

Sexuality / Intimacy

Intimacy is a process and can take a myriad of forms, such as cognitive or intellectual intimacy, experiential intimacy, emotional intimacy as well as sexual intimacy. Several articles explore how to develop intimate relationships.
counsel.ufl.edu/selfHelpInformation/relationships/types_of_intimacy~
visionofmulund.org/three-forms-of-intimacy.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intimacy
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intimate_relationship
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_intimacy

More chores may mean more sex—Recent research study confirms a long-standing intuition
online.wsj.com/article/SB1000142405274870450060...~
articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SmartSpending/blog~
foxnews.com/story/0,2933,335548,00.html

Women's tears tank men's libido: Men who sniffed women's tears produced less testosterone and found female faces less arousing, according to a January 2011 research study—Excerpt: "Communication isn't limited to language, said neuroscientist Noam Sobel of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, whose study was published online Thursday by the journal Science. "And here, we've uncovered the chemical word for 'no,' or 'not now.' "
latimes.com/health/la-he-womens-tears-20110107,0,842631.story

Women think about food more than sex, according to a January 2011 survey: 25% of women think about food every half an hour, compared to the 10% of women who think about sex over the same time span, as reported by the slimming group Shape Smart in their interviewing some 5000 men and women. Other findings: 60% of women in relationships are not happy eating in front of their partner; 50% of women in relationships are shy undressing in front of their partner; 40% of women feel as though they are constantly dieting; and 13% of women choose low-calorie meals instead of what they would actually like when eating out.
newsfeed.time.com...survey-women-think-about-food-more-than-sex~

Heart-attack risk about triples in the hours after exercise and within two hours of having sex, research results released in April 2011 show: At the same time, the overall likelihood of having a heart attack after working out or making love is still quite low—on the order of 3 in 1,000,000, as opposed to 1 in 1,000,000. The study also found that the study participants who were more physically active appeared to be less susceptible to a heart attack following intercourse or a workout. So stay in shape, enjoy both exercise and making love, and live a little, very low risks and all.
cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/03/22/health.risk.sex.workout/?hpt=Sbin

What prompts women and men to engage in sexual behavior is a timeless topic of continuing interest. What do recent surveys tell us and common mistakes men and women make regarding sex are reviewed. In the April 2010 issue of the Monitor on Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, read the interview with sex researcher Cindy Meston, Ph.D. regarding her research on why women say they have sex. A mid-September 2010 research study showed that the placebo effect significantly improves women's sexual satisfaction. [Mature topics]
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1928189,00.html~
alternet.org/sex/142952/237_reasons_why_women_have_sex/~
asylum.com.au/2009/10/01/6-reasons-men-have-sex-apart~
nationnews.com/news/local/LIFESTYLE-why-men-have-sex~
livescience.com/health/070731_top_fifty.html
men.webmd.com/features/6-sex-mistakes-men-make
news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,23729537-5005370,00.html
women.webmd.com/features/6-sex-mistakes-women-make
simplemarriage.net/10-mistakes-women-make-during-sex.html
apa.org/monitor/2010/04/complex-sex.aspx
utexas.edu/news/2010/09/15/psychology_sex_drives
esciencenews.com...placebo.effect.significantly.improves.womens.sexual.satisfaction~

Aphrodisiacs: What are historically considered aphrodisiacs (i.e., a substance that increases sexual desire or libido) and those that also have modern-day science backing up their claims? It's more than just oysters; you might be surprised. There are links for natural aphrodisiacs and vegan aphrodisiacs! [Mature topics]
articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/03/04/7-foods-for-better-sex.aspx
health.com/health/gallery/0,,20307213,00.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphrodisiac
gourmetsleuth.com/Articles/Nutrition-Health-Food-Labeling-646/aphrodisiac-foods.aspx
askmen.com/sports/foodcourt/56_eating_well.html
health.howstuffworks.com/sexual-health/sexuality/aphrodisiac.htm
homecooking.about.com/od/holidayandpartyrecipes/a/aphrodisiacs.htm
lifescript.com/Life/Sex/Libido/10_Natural_Aphrodisiacs_to_Turn_Up_the_Heat.aspx
cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/tips-moves/aphrodisiac-foods-0509
redbookmag.com/love-sex/advice/aphrodisiac-recipes
altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/aph.htm
peta.org/living/vegetarian-living/Vegan-Aphrodisiacs.aspx

What Americans tell government pollsters about sex---Biggest survey on sex in U.S. since 1994 (data collected between 2006 and 2008; results released March 2011)
washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/04/AR2010100401266.html~
washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/03/AR2011030302877.html
washingtontimes.com/news/2011/mar/3/government-survey-virgins-at-40-do-exist/
post-gazette.com/pg/11063/1129574-84.stm
yourlife.usatoday.com...Study-Fewer-teens-engaging-in-sexual-behavior~
dailycaller.com/2011/03/03/government-releases-new-data-on-american-sexual-habits/
physorg.com/news/2011-03-sex-young-adults-teens.html

Major survey of Sexual Behavior in the U.S.: Research results released in October 2010 being published in a set of articles in the Journal of Sexual Medicine revealed how sex has changed in the nearly 20 years since the last study of sexual behavior in the U.S. The current study results showed that one of four acts of vaginal intercourse are condom protected in the U.S. (one in three among singles). Further, condom use is higher among African-Americans and Hispanic Americans than among caucasian Americans and other racial groups. The data showed, contrary to prevailing views, that many contemporary adolescents are being responsible by abstaining or by using condoms when having sex. Adults over the age of 40, obviously including the Baby Boomers< have the lowest rates of condom use. Adults using a condom for intercourse were just as likely to rate the sexual extent positively in terms of arousal, pleasure and orgasm than when having intercourse without one. [Mature topics]
nationalsexstudy.indiana.edu
nationalsexstudy.indiana.edu/condomgraph.html
nationalsexstudy.indiana.edu/graph.html

Couples who delay having sex get benefits later, research results released in December 2010 found—This study of 2,035 married individuals found the following benefits enjoyed by couples who waited until marriage compared to those who started having sex in the early part of their relationship: relationship stability rated 22 percent higher; relationship satisfaction rated 20 percent higher; sexual quality of the relationship rated 15 percent better; and communication rated 12 percent better.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101222112102.htm
ts-si.org/relationships/28191-delay-sex-increase-benefits
wisecounsel.wordpress.com...delaying-sex-til-marriage-improves-your-relationship~

Prostitution: Five myths about prostitution. What draws women to become prostitutes? What draws the men who go to them? Should prostitution be made legal? Sex workers, prostitution and AIDS? [Mature topics]
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution
prostitutionresearch.com/
rapeis.org/activism/prostitution/prostitutionfacts.html
news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-20030954-71.html
washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/10/AR2010091002670.html
mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=28997
wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_do_women_become_prostitutes
guardian.co.uk/world/2007/dec/11/gender.socialexclusion
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1324819/
mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=42821&cn=10
guardian.co.uk/world/2002/apr/08/gender.uk
prostitution.procon.org/
articles.latimes.com/2008/mar/13/opinion/oe-kelly13
chartsbin.com/view/snb
chartsbin.com/view/q4y
avert.org/prostitution-aids.htm
ecpatusa.org/

Those men who most frequently used women in prostitution were most likely to have committed sexually aggressive acts against non-prostituting women among other results, according to research of men who bought sex in Scotland reported in March 2011. Scary. [Mature topics]
psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2011-06105-001

Marital sex - Sexual Frequency - Health Benefits: What is so-called "normal" (i.e., what the majority of people do in a given society at a given time) in the United States for married and cohabitation couples in regard to rates of intimacy/intercourse? Research shows that rates have increased among married couples in recent decades, declines with age, and recently have slightly declined, although rates vary widely. March 2010 research findings show that healthier men, no matter their age, have better sex more frequently and desire it more often than healthier women, and a healthier sex life could mean a longer life. This finding is interpreted as a possible powerful incentive for losing weight to positively impact men diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure. Previously, a 1997 study that tracked the overall health with sexual frequency and the mortality of about 1,000 middle-aged men over the timespan of a decade, showed that men who reported the highest frequency of climax experienced half the death rate. There are many health benefits of sex, including stress relief, an improved sense of smell, a reduced risk of heart disease, weight loss and overall fitness, pain relief, reduced depression, better bladder control, less frequent colds and flu, modest good exercise, better sleep, improved mood and a longer life. [Mature topics]
family.jrank.org/pages/1102/Marital-Sex-Sexual-Frequency.html
family.jrank.org/pages/1103/Marital-Sex-Decline-Sexual-Frequency~
family.jrank.org/pages/1108/Marital-Sex-Conclusion.html
ehow.com/about_4692034_what-normal-amount-libido.html
webmd.com/sex-relationships/features/10-surprising-health-benefits-~
newsweek.com/id/74575
yourtotalhealth.ivillage.com/health-benefits-sex.html?pageNum=1
tantra-sex.com/ummsummer00.html
askmen.com/dating/dzimmer/18_love_answers.html
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1970975,00.html?xid=newsletter-daily
articles.mercola.com..healthier-men-want-more-sex-for-more-years~
cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/03/09/healthy.sex/index.html?hpt=C1
articles.mercola.com...sexual-orgasm-increases-longevity~
bmj.com~
online.wsj.com/article~


 People Skills / Relationship building & Self-Esteem | Memory & Brain Exercises | Sleep | Sexuality / Intimacy | Pornography

Pornography

Pornography's soaring use, statistics and impact it has on intimacy, libido, sexuality, marriage and relationships: The increase in viewing of pornography, especially over the internet, has soared in recent years, particularly with the younger generation. What is the impact of viewing pornography? Is pornography addictive? Is pornography degrading? Does pornography lower and desensitize libido, have women who think they can never measure up, and turns men off from the real thing? March 26, 2010 issue of The New York Times offers several articles on child pornography. Many groups are against pornography. Jill C. Manning, Ph.D., LMFT's July 2008 article "The Impact of Pornography on Women" seems to be a balanced view of pornography and its impact on women. Naomi Wolf's article "The Porn Myth" from the March 2010 issue of magazine New York is well worth reading. [Mature Topics]
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pornography
covenanteyes.com..pornographys-effects-on-romantic-relationships~
psychologytoday.com/blog/bias-and-its-tinted-lens/200904/lay-perceptions
antisex.info/en/stat2.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pornography_addiction
internet-filter-review.toptenreviews.com/internet-pornography-statistics.html
men.webmd.com/guide/is-pornography-addictive
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_pornography
topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics...child_pornography~
asacp.org
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-pornography_movement
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_Against_Pornography
...winst.org...Manning - The Impact of Pornography on Women~
nymag.com/nymetro/news/trends/n_9437

Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a behavioral treatment that draws upon mindfulness, Dr. Michael Twohig at Utah State University has found encouraging results in a small study treating pornography viewing. Read more about this approach at the last link below.
mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=40692&cn=66

Exposure to pornography is associated with restructuring the brain, mind, memory and subverting freedom of speech and associated with feelings of guilt, shame, regret and humiliation, "porn impotence" and is seen by many women as a form of infidelity, according to several sources. Pornography addiction is highly controversial and issues of its existence are continually disputed. Although pornography addiction is one of the few addictions considered to be purely a psychological addiction, most doctors don't consider it an actual addiction, but rather a sub-condition of obsessive-compulsive disorder. The case for this has not been substantially made to date. At the same time, pornography addiction shows the similar symptoms of not being able to control how often they engages in the behavior, work up a tolerance to it, engage in it to rid themselves of stress, and engage in the behavior instead of having personal and social interactions. When an addict looks at porn, testosterone, dopamine, oxycontin, and serotonin are released, creating what Judith Reisman, Ph.D. refers to as an "erototoxin." She further notes, “[Pornography] could be more addictive than crack cocaine because cocaine can be excreted from the body. Pornographic images cannot. They remain, structurally and neurochemically, with a person forever.” What is called "porn impotence," where the man experiences sexuality preferentially with porn instead of a woman, is a growing phenomenon, as is erectile dysfunction. An abnormal degree of stimulation of internet porn producing cascades of dopamine can apparently numb or inhibit the pleasure response of your brain, producing lowered libido and erectile dysfunction for some. Other articles make the case that many women view the pornographic activities of their partners "as a form of infidelity." Some growing evidence points to those who view pornography as developing new neuro-pathways and maps in their brains on the basis of repeated exposure to the photos and videos viewed.
serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/345
pornharms.com/full_article.php?article_no=287
abqjournal.com/health/24214434health05-24-10.htm
illusionsprogram.net/the-problem-with-porn.html
salvomag.com/new/articles/salvo13/13hilton.php
goodmenproject.com/health/how-porn-can-ruin-your-sex-life-and-your-marriage

Child sex crimes fell when a ban on all sexually explicit material, including child pornography, was lifted by the new democratic government in Czech Republic in 1989 according to a new study released in December 2010: Scientists think the reason may be that potential offenders may use pornography as a stand-in for sex crimes. The conclusion of the new study is that 'artificially-produced' child pornography should be made available to prevent real children being abused. This report is highly controversial and provoking many strong opinions in the press. [Mature Topics]
dnaindia.com/lifestyle/report_legalising-child-pornography-could-deter-child-sex-abuse-study_1475156
blogs.chron.com/momhouston/2010/12/researchers_find_legalizing_ch.html
dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1334656/Child-porn-legal-protect-children-abusers-say-scientists.html

 

George Demont Otis     Carmel Moonlight
 

© Copyright 2013 by Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D.
 
 


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