Welcome to the archived web site of
Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. Psychologist (1950-2013)
California License No. PSY 10092
 
Specializing in Presence-Centered Therapy
balancing mind and heart, body and spirit

Now in memoriam - This website is no longer being updated

 


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Links: Resources for Life | Search Links

Resource Link Catagories:

Parenting: Pre-Natal, Peri-Natal, Infants, Toddlers, Children, Adolescents & Early Adulthood

Postpartum Support, Pre-Natal / Peri-Natal Psychology, Baby Names, Infants & Toddlers | Children / Adolescents Risks, ADD / ADHD, Study Skills & Homework | Technology's Impact on Youth, Teen Birth Rate & College / Early Adulthood Risks and prevention

Postpartum Support for Mother

Postpartum Support International: Resources, news, bookstore and a helpline regarding emotional health related to childbirth. The site states that 1 in 8 women suffer from postpartum mood disorder.
postpartum.net

Nurture Mother: A site dedicated to offering practical help for mothers by psychologist Rick Hanson, Ph.D. and Jan Hanson
nurturemom.com

Pre-natal (Before Birth) & Peri-natal (During and just After Birth) Psychology

Pre-natal (before birth) and peri-natal (during and just after birth) psychology provides a fascinating glimpse into our earliest times of life. Blighted twin syndrome / Phantom twin syndrome: There are many issues that have their roots in the very earliest experiences in being alive. One phenomenon is the "blighted twin syndrome" or "phantom twin syndrome" which describes that an estimated 70 percent of all twins conceived do not reach term, with the surviving twin possibly experiencing the loss and retaining this in cellular memory. Psychotherapist Barbara R. Findeisen, MFT, a leading writer and leader in pre-natal and peri-natal psychology, describes this occurrence among others in a fine 2005 paper published in the lead journal of the field and entitled "Prenatal and Perinatal Losses" and in another link is also interviewed. Author Annie Murphy Paul's book Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives (2010) is the subject of a New York Times book review and podcast, along with a cover article in Time magazine. New York Times Op-Ed columnist Nicholas D.Kristof writes about a building body of empirical evidence for how following genes and environment, our uterine environment appears to be the third factor that shape our lives.
birthpsychology.com/lifebefore
birthpsychology.com/lifebefore/early.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-_and_perinatal_psychology
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prenatal_and_perinatal_psychology
wondrousbeginnings.com/html/ppn.html
trvernymd.com
tenmoonsrising.org/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
birthpsychology.com
isppm.de/index_e.html
wondersofthewomb.com/links.htm
terrylarimore.com/PrenatalLosses.html
birthpsychology.com/lifebefore/early6.html
nytimes.com/2010/10/03/books/review/Groopman-t.html
artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com...book-review-podcast-annie-murphy-pauls-origins~
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2020815,00.html
nytimes.com/2010/10/03/opinion/03kristof.html
 

Baby Names / Infants / Toddlers / Pre-School

Names / Baby Names—NameVoyager explores baby names, their popularity since the 1880's, meaning, derivation, nicknames and so on: It is valuable to learn what one's name means and its roots since these are usually quite revealing and accurate. Other sites also offer similar information. Amazing!
babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=&ms=false&sw=f&exact=false
babynames.com/Names/Popular
behindthename.com
babyhold.com
thinkbabynames.com

Giving infants solid food before 4 months old linked to obesity at age 3: Research results released in February 2011 in the journal Pediatrics showed that in a study of 847 children among formula-fed infants or infants weaned before the age of 4 months, introduction of solid foods before the age of 4 months was associated with increased odds of obesity at age 3 years.
medicalnewstoday.com/articles/215969.php
abcnews.go.com.../introducing-solid-food-puts-babies-risk-early-obesity~

Scientific researchers are discovering that infants and toddlers (birth to age 3) can develop some very adult psychological conditions, such as depression, fear, dread, defiance, aggression and attention deficits: A March 2011 Time magazine article "Small Child, Big Worries" mentions the nonprofit child-advocacy group Zero to Three estimates that about 10% of very young children have some kind of clinical emotional condition, about the same rate as the adult population. Zero to Three publishes a diagnostic classification handbook, DC: 0-3, which is modeled on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual—Volume IV-TR (DSM-IV-TR), the guidebook for adult mental/psychological disorders. There is a growing body of research snowing that many psychological conditions, including post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social-anxiety disorder, major depression, insomnia, and prolonged bereavement, also afflict young children. The article is supportive of parents obtaining professional advise and addressing their own emotional challenges and problems such as depression and substance abuse. An excerpt: "There's a phenomenon we call attunement," says psychologist Edward Zigler of the Yale University School of Medicine. "It's that dance of the swans between parent and baby." Moms and dads should practice that well, because before they know it, their children dance away from them completely." Other links also look at this body of research, not how seldom the infants and toddlers get treatment and offer researcher's recommendations.
time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2058206,00.html
apa.org/news/press/releases/2011/02/babies-mental-illness.aspx
connectionsps.com/When%20do%20infants%20benefit.htm

Pre-school and Head Start are powerful and effective means of early-childnood education: Research shows that early childhood education helps poor children succeed in school, so long as it is of high quality. Other links also detail the value of early-childhood education and provide resources for patents in helping their child. The consensus of early childhood education being invaluable is likely to be a highly realistic one.
washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/03/AR2010100303621.html?wpisrc=nl_cuzhead
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_childhood_education
online.wsj.com/article/SB121997547720682181.html
opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2006/12/07/the-real-value-of-public-preschool
denverpost.com/opinion/ci_4752735
post-gazette.com/pg/09296/1007690-298.stm
nieer.org/docs/index.php?DocID=292
ocregister.com/articles/preschool-261266-home-kids.html
old.sandi.net/initiatives/preschool/research.html
www.ed.gov
nea.org/home/18163.htm
teach-nology.com/teachers/early_education
naeyc.org
acei.org
ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/reports/topic.aspx?tid=13
umaine.edu/eceol

Postprtum Support, Pre-Natal / Peri-Natal Psychology, Baby Names, Infants & Toddlers | Children / Adolescents Risks, ADD / ADHD, Study Skills & Homework | Technology's Impact on Youth, Teen Birth Rate & College / Early Adulthood Risks and prevention

Children: Risks and Prevention

Mercury-Containing Medicines could be Harmful to Children: Medical doctor Dr. Mercola in March 2011 summarizes several recent research studies confirming that mercury in vaccines and other medical products could cause harm, such as triggering autism. Further links and comments are on the link below.
articles.mercola.com...2011/03/28/mercurycontaining-medicines-harmful-to-children~

Parents beware: Secondhand smoke linked to kids' psychological (mental) symptoms including depression, anxiety and ADHD, according to research results released in April 2011
sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/04/06/MNU61IQH2H.DTL
latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-second-hand-smoke-mental-health-20110405,0,1370293.story
huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/06/second-hand-smoke-mental-disorder_n_845170.html

Kids are recommended to sit in rear-facing car seats as long as they fit, or until age 2, according to pediatricians as reported in March 2011. After infants ride in rear-facing car safety seats, then it is best that they ride in forward-facing car seats with a harness until age four or until they have outgrown the seat, and then they can be switched to a belt-positioning booster seat until they can use the seatbelt alone (typically between eight and 12 years, or when they've reached 4 feet 9 inches. Most useful information for safety-minded parents wanting to do their best to protect their children.
foxnews.com/health/2011/03/21/doctors-kids-ride-rear-facing-seats-longer/

Self-Control has long-term health and success benefits, and self-control or the lack of it is contagious—Children who showed early signs of self-control/self-mastery were less likely to to have developed addictions or committed a crime by adulthood and were also healthier and wealthier than their more impulsive peers: Research on following 1,000 children in New Zealand from birth to age 32, released in January 2011, suggested that a lack of self-control during youth may predict health problems, less financial stability and a criminal history by adulthood. Study results found that kids who scored lowest on measures of self-control, that is, being easily frustrated, more impulsive and had the most trouble with delayed gratification/waiting their turn, were about three times more likely by adulthood to report multiple health problems, addictions, committing a crime or earning less than $20,000 a year than kids with the most self-control. About 7 percent of the children dramatically increased their own self-control over the course of the research indicating that self-control can be learned, although it was not clear exactly how this occurred in this study. These results confirm the findings of the popular Stanford marshmallow study which found that young children who were able to resist grabbing a fluffy marshmallow placed in front of them for as long as 15 minutes in order to get two of them later went on to score an average of 210 points higher on the SAT than kids who couldn't wait. Only about a third of the 4-to-6 ear-olds studied were able to bear the sweet temptation. Paralleling the research offered here, the kids with greater self-control in the marshmallow experiment had better life outcomes across the board. Another study released in January 2010 found evidence that self-control, or it's lack thereof, is contagious across behaviors. Clearly teaching kids to self-regulate early on, in home, school and community or public environments, may well lead to healthier, more productive and more stable adults. As portrayed in fables like 'The Tortoise and the Hare' and 'The Ant and the Grasshopper,' delaying gratification, developing patience and simply hanging in are all aspects of self-control and self-regulation that reap huge benefits in life.
healthland.time.com/2011/01/24/the-key-to-health-wealth-and-success-self-control
online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704279704576102164041456434.html
content.usatoday.com...study-self-control-at-age-5-key-to-future~
newyorker.com/reporting/2009/05/18/090518fa_fact_lehrer
spring.org.uk/2008/09/how-to-improve-your-self-control.php
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100113172359.htm
wikihow.com/Build-Self-Control
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self_control

After traumatic event, early intervention reduces odd of PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) by 73%: Research findings from October 2010 from the University of Pennsylvania showed that a new approach that helps improve communication between child and caregiver, such as recognizing and managing traumatic stress symptoms and teach coping skills, was able to prevent chronic and sub-clinical PTSD in 73 percent of children. Another link also advocated the effectiveness of early intervention following trauma. Well targeted early intervention makes all the world of a difference.
uphs.upenn.edu/news/News_Releases/2010/09/child-ptsd-early-intervention
docs.google.com...krisepsyk.no...After+Traumatic+Event,+Early+Intervention Reduces+Odds+of+PTSD+in+Children+by+73+Percen~

Frequent childhood moves linked to adult lower well-being and shorter life, especially for introverts according to June 2010 research:
apa.org/news/press/releases/2010/06/moving-well-being.aspx
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603172213.htm
medicine.journalfeeds.com/psychiatry...residential-mobility-well-being-and-mortality~

Original article:
....apa.org/pubs...psp-98-6-980.pdf+Residential+Mobility,+Well-Being,+and+Mortalit~
apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-98-6-980.pdf

The Kids Aren't All Right—New data from APA's Stress in America survey indicate parents don't know what's bothering their children: A November 2009 online survey conducted by Harris Interactive for the American Psychological Association of children age 8 to 17 indicate that they worry about doing well in school, getting into good colleges and their family finances along with suffering headaches, sleeplessness and upset stomachs. These stresses and symptoms are going largely unnoticed by parents survey findings show. The findings for adults are equally troubling with stress levels being high, such as 42% of adults indicating their stress worsened in the past year and 24% said they had an extreme level of stress. About two-thirds of adults said they've been diagnosed by a physician with a chronic condition, most commonly high blood pressure or high cholesterol. Similar to the findings in the November 2008 survey, women again report having experienced more stress symptoms than men, such as irritability or anger, fatigue and depression. Quite a snapshot of America and a wake-up call:
apa.org/news/press/releases/2009/11/stress.aspx

Bullying: Know the various forms of bullying and ways parents and kids can effectively deal with it. Lots of great resources. The San Francisco Chronicle and SFGate.com provided an "Open Forum" on the topic of "What works to stop bullying" in late December 2010 that is well worth reading. Lots of great resources According to a February 2011 report by Dr. Mercola, children killing themselves as a result of being bullied has been a particular focus in the media recently. An excerpt: "As of 2007, suicide ranked as the third leading cause of death among young people (ages 15 to 24), exceeded only by accidents and homicides. Sadly, suicides account for 1.4 percent of all deaths in the U.S. each year, but comprise 12.2 percent of all deaths among 15-24 year-olds. In other words, the proportion of deaths resulting from suicide amongst teenagers is nine times the proportion for adults!" Interpersonal conflict tops the list of reasons youth commit suicide. Also a recent review of 37 international studies exploring bullying and suicidal risk concluded that children who are victims, perpetrators or even witnesses to bullying have an increased risk for suicidal thoughts. A "Teen Suicide Risk Calculator" link below may be useful realizing not to rely exclusively on any one source of information or tool.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying#Definition
aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/bullying
kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/bullying/bullies.html#
mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/SVP-0052
education.com/topic/school-bullying-teasing
safeyouth.org/scripts/topics/bullying.asp
sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/21/EDND1GRARQ.DTL
articles.mercola.com...signs-your-teen-may-be-contemplating-suicide~
healthcalculators.org/calculators/teen_suicide.asp

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in April 2011 issued a report: "Bullying Among Middle School and High School Students—Massachusetts, 2009" that provides a fairly current readout on bullying in the middle and high school setting. Chilling.
cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6015a1~

Social rejection and intense social loss activate the same areas of brain that signify physical pain, research findings released in May 2011 show. This result seems to be applicable to child/adolescent rejection, isolation and being bullied as well as romantic rejection.
nytimes.com/2011/05/15/fashion/is-rejection-painful-actually-it-is-studied.html
nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_110335.html

Web of popularity, achieved by bullying: A February 2011 New York Times article chronicles recent research that found that high school students near the top of the social hierarchy of popularity are often both perpetrators and victims of aggressive behavior involving their peers. Two studies suggest that the various forms of teenage aggression and victimization occur through the social ranks as students jockey to improve their status. The findings seem to contradict the idea of the school bully as aggressive and maladjusted by nature. Rather, when it comes to mean behavior, the role of individual traits is overstated and a great deal of it comes down to concern about status, especially in the middle and upper ranges of status. It also appears that it's not just popularity that influences aggressive behavior, but how much the student is concerned and cares about being popular. Other research shows that one in four youths have been involved in bullying in some way and that bullies are often "popular" (mainly peers dislike and have no real respect for them) out of fear while victims suffer and are at risk for suicide. Children fell into the three groups of bullies, victims and bully-victims. Another study reported that when both bullies and victims are boys, bullies are popular and victims are unpopular, while when a body bullies a girl, the female victim is often popular and the male bully is unpopular. Findings show a great variability in their popularity and, to some extent, the targets of bullying.
well.blogs.nytimes.com/
businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/649636.html
suicide.org/study-on-bullying-risk-for-suicide.html
athealth.com/Consumer/disorders/Bullying%20in%20Adolescence.html
education.com/reference/article/hidden-bully-popular-aggressive-children/
ezinearticles...Girl-Bullying-Prevention-Rumor-Spreading-Verbal-Abuse...Isolation~
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607717

Children / Adolescent ADD/ADHA

Attention Deficit Disorder(ADD) & Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) for children: November 2010 government study said that one in 10 U.S. children has ADHD, a sizable increase from just a few years ago. While children (or adults) qualify for ADD with a significant loading on checklist items for inattention and impulsivity, ADHD includes these two variables along with hyperactivity. Information, resources and intervention strategies are available through the links below.
online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703805004575606793870558632~
health.google.com/health/ref/Attention+deficit+hyperactivity+disorder~
add-adhd.org/ADHD_attention-deficit.html
webmd.com/add-adhd/default.htm
borntoexplore.org/whatisadd.htm
add.about.com
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder
addresources.org

Adolescents: Risks and Prevention

30.9% or an estimated 7.8 million of U.S. youth between ages 12 to 17 engaged in at least one violent behavior during the last year: The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services in late September 2010 looking at combined data from 2004 to 2008 reported 22.6% engaged in a serious fight while at school or work, 16.1% engaged in group-against-group fighting and 7.6% attacked at least one person "with the intent to seriously hurt them." About 40% in families whose annual income is less than $20,000 / year engaged in one of these behaviors, while about 25% in families whose annual income is at least $75,000 engaged in one of these behaviors.
oas.samhsa.gov/2k10/189/ViolentBehaviors.cfm

60% of U.S. high school students said they had "cheated on a test," (and 34% did so twice or more), 52% of teens ages 15 to 18 have hit someone in anger, 50% said they had "bullied, teased or taunted someone at least once," 47% had been "bullied, teased or taunted in a way that seriously upset me at least once," 28% (37% boys, 19% girls) say it is okay to hit or threaten a person who angers them, and 27% said they "stole something from a store" in a survey of 43,321 teens, from 78 public and 22 private schools, released in October 2010---Obviously there is a great deal of anger among our high school age youth to put it mildly!
usatoday.com...2010-10-26-bullyingONLINE~

Frequent childhood moves linked to adult lower well-being and shorter life, especially for introverts according to June 2010 research:
apa.org/news/press/releases/2010/06/moving-well-being.aspx
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603172213.htm
medicine.journalfeeds.com/psychiatry...residential-mobility-well-being-and-mortality~

Original article:
....apa.org/pubs...psp-98-6-980.pdf+Residential+Mobility,+Well-Being,+and+Mortalit~
apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/psp-98-6-980.pdf

Life-protective humanitarian support for gay teens: The "It Gets Better" campaign, aimed at letting troubled gay teens know there's life after bullying, is a brainchild of sex/relationship columnist Dan Savage with his syndicated Savage Love column.
itgetsbetter.org/pages/about-it-gets-better-project/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Gets_Better_Project
blogs.psychcentral.com/celebrity/2010/10/celebrities-supporting-lgbt-project-it-gets-better/
itgetsbetter.org/
youtube.com/watch?v=7skPnJOZYdA
itgetsbetter.org/video/
blog.seattlepi.com/thebigblog/2010/09/21/dan-savage-launches-youtube-channel-to-help-gay-teens/

The Kids Aren't All Right—New data from APA's Stress in America survey indicate parents don't know what's bothering their children: A November 2009 online survey conducted by Harris Interactive for the American Psychological Association of children age 8 to 17 indicate that they worry about doing well in school, getting into good colleges and their family finances along with suffering headaches, sleeplessness and upset stomachs. These stresses and symptoms are going largely unnoticed by parents survey findings show. The findings for adults are equally troubling with stress levels being high, such as 42% of adults indicating their stress worsened in the past year and 24% said they had an extreme level of stress. About two-thirds of adults said they've been diagnosed by a physician with a chronic condition, most commonly high blood pressure or high cholesterol. Similar to the findings in the November 2008 survey, women again report having experienced more stress symptoms than men, such as irritability or anger, fatigue and depression. Quite a snapshot of America and a wake-up call:
apa.org/news/press/releases/2009/11/stress.aspx

Teen girls in most deprived areas are at greater risk, including 5X more likely to be assaulted, violence third leading cause of death for 15-19 year olds and assault rates for boys 2X those for girls, according to a December 2010 report. Alarming.
eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-12/bmj-tgi122210.php
emj.bmj.com/content/early/2010/11/12/emj.2009.090282.abstract
medicalnewstoday.com/articles/212275.php

Teenagers talking with parents—Research shows the dynamics of teenagers opening up and talking with parents in a recent 2010 study showing why male or female teenagers don't talk to parents about sex. Other links explore this subject with some helpful guidelines.
nytimes.com/2010/06/13/fashion/13studied.html
republicanherald.com/news/parents-learn-tips-on-talking-to-teens-1.735579
parents.berkeley.edu/advice/teens/talk.html
life.familyeducation.com/peer-pressure/self-image/36377.html
kidshealth.org/teen/your_mind/families/talk_to_parents.html
voices.washingtonpost.com/answer-sheet/reading/-the-answer-sheet-likes.html
adventuresinparenting.org/2008/07/16/5-things-parents-do-that-annoys-their-kids
youngwomenshealth.org/be_there.html
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1945759,00.html
pamf.org/teen/parents/sex/talksex.html

Bullying: Know the various forms of bullying and ways parents and kids can effectively deal with it. Lots of great resources. The San Francisco Chronicle and SFGate.com provided an "Open Forum" on the topic of "What works to stop bullying" in late December 2010 that is well worth reading. Lots of great resources According to a February 2011 report by Dr. Mercola, children killing themselves as a result of being bullied has been a particular focus in the media recently. An excerpt: "As of 2007, suicide ranked as the third leading cause of death among young people (ages 15 to 24), exceeded only by accidents and homicides. Sadly, suicides account for 1.4 percent of all deaths in the U.S. each year, but comprise 12.2 percent of all deaths among 15-24 year-olds. In other words, the proportion of deaths resulting from suicide amongst teenagers is nine times the proportion for adults!" Interpersonal conflict tops the list of reasons youth commit suicide. Also a recent review of 37 international studies exploring bullying and suicidal risk concluded that children who are victims, perpetrators or even witnesses to bullying have an increased risk for suicidal thoughts. A "Teen Suicide Risk Calculator" link below may be useful realizing not to rely exclusively on any one source of information or tool.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying#Definition
aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/bullying
kidshealth.org/teen/school_jobs/bullying/bullies.html#
mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/publications/allpubs/SVP-0052
education.com/topic/school-bullying-teasing
safeyouth.org/scripts/topics/bullying.asp
sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/21/EDND1GRARQ.DTL
articles.mercola.com...signs-your-teen-may-be-contemplating-suicide~
healthcalculators.org/calculators/teen_suicide.asp

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in April 2011 issued a report: "Bullying Among Middle School and High School Students—Massachusetts, 2009" that provides a fairly current readout on bullying in the middle and high school setting. Chilling.
cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6015a1~

Social rejection and intense social loss activate the same areas of brain that signify physical pain, research findings released in May 2011 show. This result seems to be applicable to child/adolescent rejection, isolation and being bullied as well as romantic rejection.
nytimes.com/2011/05/15/fashion/is-rejection-painful-actually-it-is-studied.html
nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_110335.html

Web of popularity, achieved by bullying: A February 2011 New York Times article chronicles recent research that found that high school students near the top of the social hierarchy of popularity are often both perpetrators and victims of aggressive behavior involving their peers. Two studies suggest that the various forms of teenage aggression and victimization occur through the social ranks as students jockey to improve their status. The findings seem to contradict the idea of the school bully as aggressive and maladjusted by nature. Rather, when it comes to mean behavior, the role of individual traits is overstated and a great deal of it comes down to concern about status, especially in the middle and upper ranges of status. It also appears that it's not just popularity that influences aggressive behavior, but how much the student is concerned and cares about being popular. Other research shows that one in four youths have been involved in bullying in some way and that bullies are often "popular" (mainly peers dislike and have no real respect for them) out of fear while victims suffer and are at risk for suicide. Children fell into the three groups of bullies, victims and bully-victims. Another study reported that when both bullies and victims are boys, bullies are popular and victims are unpopular, while when a body bullies a girl, the female victim is often popular and the male bully is unpopular. Findings show a great variability in their popularity and, to some extent, the targets of bullying.
well.blogs.nytimes.com/
businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/649636.html
suicide.org/study-on-bullying-risk-for-suicide.html
athealth.com/Consumer/disorders/Bullying%20in%20Adolescence.html
education.com/reference/article/hidden-bully-popular-aggressive-children/
ezinearticles...Girl-Bullying-Prevention-Rumor-Spreading-Verbal-Abuse...Isolation~
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18607717

Children & Adolescents: Study Skills & Homework Resources

Study skills are incredibly undervalued and make a world of a difference!!—Here are some great study skills resources. A wonderful book is The Great Big Book of How To Study (1999) by Ronald W. Fry. Recent research findings summarized in a September 2010 New York Times article concluded that the best study skills often are not in accord with popular theories and common wisdom. Cognitive researchers have found that alternating the room where a person studies improves retention, as does studying distinct but related skills or concepts in one setting, instead of focusing intensely on a single thing. Learning gradually over time, such as studying an hour a night for an upcoming exam (also called "spacing") improves later recall according to dozens of studies. "Zero support" was found for the notion that children have specific learning styles, like visual or auditory learners and left-brain or right-brain learners. Thus, while motivation and impressing friends helps effective studying, the latest techniques of alternating study environments, mixing content, spacing study sessions, and self-testing have been shown to be quite useful. During their first two years in a university, 45 percent of students "did not demonstrate any significant improvement in learning as measured by a standard test, a study of 3,000 students at 29 four-year universities released in January 2011 found. After the full four years, 36 percent had shown no development in critical thinking, reasoning and writing skills because of easy classes and too little time spent studying. Does anyone get how important developing outstanding study skills are?
how-to-study.com
shambles.net/pages/staff/StudyS
greatschools.org/students/homework-help/study-skills-for-middle-school-and-beyond.gs?content=322
howtodothings.com/education/a2964-how-to-improve-study-skills-in-middle-school~
mindtools.com/pages/main/newMN_ISS.htm
studygs.net
Virginia Tech : academic_support/study_skills_information.html
adprima.com/studyout.htm
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Study_skills
howtostudy.org/resources.php
infoplease.com/homework/studyskills1.html
sas.calpoly.edu/asc/ssl.html
instruct.westvalley.edu/norris/studyskills.html
nytimes.com...health/views/07mind.html?_r=2&ref=health&pagewanted=all~
google.com/hostednews/afp/article~

Homework Help for Free: Homework Help Site has a Social Networking Twist: Piazza, a Web site for homework help, helps build on classroom community by having peers and educators respond to questions. Other links below provide free help and further resource links to address a broad range of educational levels, including elementary, middle and high school as well as college, and a wide range of school subjects, including all levels of math/ Algebra, science, social studies, health, arts and reference. One link provides the 100 best websites for Free Homework Help!
nytimes.com/2011/07/04/technology/04piazza.html?src=recg
onlinecollegecourses.com/2009/08/19/100-best-websites-for-free-homework-help/
chatterbeeshomework.homestead.com/
hippocampus.org/
jiskha.com/
pppst.com/resources.html
freemathhelp.com/
tutornext.com/homework-help
math.com/
algebra.com/
brightstorm.com/science

Take a test to really learn, research released in January 2011 suggests: Students who take an exam rather than cram are found to retain more. The research found that the most effective study method combined two study sessions with retrieval practice and tests that asked students to recall what they had read. Read the New York Times article summarizing this research as well as read readers' comments.
nytimes.com/2011/01/21/science/21memory.html?_r=1
community.nytimes.com...2011/01/21/science/21memory~

Seven essential life skills all children can benefit from: Reviewing research on child development and neuroscience, Ellen Galinsky in her book Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs (2010) highlights: (1) focus and self control; (2) perspective taking; (3) communicating; (4) making connections; (5) critical thinking; (6) taking on challenges; and (7) self-directed, engaged learning. She also provides personal accounts from researchers and parents, play activities, and suggestions for how to teach these skills. Read the text of her informative address previewing her new book to the Department of Education at the University of California, Irvine on February 3, 2010.
familiesandwork.org/site/about/staff.html
familiesandwork.org/blog/mitm
amazon.com/Mind-Making-Seven-Essential-Skills~

Handwriting Skills are key to helping students learn, according to a July 2011 article summarizing recent research results: Handwriting proficiency can change how children learn and their brain development, specifically it hones fine motor skills, improves letter recognition (the #1 predictor of reading ability at age 5), helps create better grades, helps compose essays more prolifically, aids memory, inspires confidence, engages different brain circuits in helping integrate motor pathways, and is enhanced by the use of technology (hand-scribble notes on a touch screen). Other links provide further support for handwriting being a modality that aids learning on many levels.
contracostatimes.com/ci_18412383
nbcnewyork.com/blogs/go-healthy-ny/Handwriting-Has-Psychological-Health-Benefits-for-Kids-123993259.html
lifehacker.com/5738093/why-you-learn-more-effectively-by-writing-than-typing
lovenotebooks.com/blog/the-long-term-benefits-of-writing-in-longhand/
blog.coreknowledge.org/2009/01/29/handwriting-is-still-alive/
curiousparents.com/Main/xq/asp/article.208hand/qx/article.htm
zaner-bloser.com/about/newsandresearch/research/detail.aspx?id=78
bigthink.com/ideas/38937
online.wsj.com/article_email/SB10001424052748704631504575531932754922518-lMyQjAxMTAwMDAwNDEwNDQyWj.html

Postpartum Support, Pre-Natal / Peri-Natal Psychology, Baby Names, Infants & Toddlers | Children / Adolescents Risks, ADD / ADHD, Study Skills & Homework | Technology's Impact on Youth, Teen Birth Rate & College / Early Adulthood Risks and prevention

Internet / Gaming / Computers / Technology Impact on Youth

Percentage of Americans who say they spend less time with household members since being connected to the Internet at home has nearly tripled from 11 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2008: The Annenberg Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California offered these results in a June 2009 press release entitled "Family Time Decreasing With Internet Use" and surmise that it cannot be a good thing that families are spending less face to face time together as it eventually leads to less cohesive and less communicative families.
digitalcenter.org/pages/recent_findings_content.asp~
enotalone.com/article/19683.html
abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=7844764

Internet Use—Advantages, disadvantages and strategies: Research dated 11/4/2009 show that internet and mobile phone use are not linked to social isolation. The internet also hasn't pulled people away from public places like cafes, parks and restaurants, actually just the opposite. Research reported from the United Kingdom in May, 2010 found that there is a link between Internet access and well-being. Those with lower incomes or fewer qualifications, people living in the developing world and women benefit more. Overall the study showed that access to the Internet leads people to feel better about their lives, and this finding does not appear to increase with age—old and young all get something out of surfing the web.The surprising finding that women benefit more may relate to the Web being used as a tool to help keep their home lives organized by giving them communication with the outside world, access to networks and broadly supporting friendships through emails and social networks. Dangers of the internet include the negative impact of internet addiction, pornography, on-line gambling, cyber-crime, cyber-stalking, predators, identity theft, and increased loneliness and depression. People at high risk for getting into trouble on the internet include lack of family bonds, low self-esteem, inability to express opinions and questions, and inability to socialize. See warning signs for internet addiction along with dos and don'ts for safer internet use for our kids.
invir.com/int-bus-advantages.html
youngmedia.org.au/mediachildren/06_10_internet_benefits.htm
buzzle.com/articles/advantages-disadvantages-internet.html
pondered.org/the_internet.html
free-computer-tips.info/tutorials/internet-tips/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-internet.html
nytimes.com.../business/AP-US-TEC-TechBit-Internet-Isolation~
cyberethics.info/cyethics2/page.php?pageID=70&mpath=/86/88
simpletoremember.com... Internet-Addiction...Warning-Signs~
ehow.com/how_5186978_protect-child-dangers-internet-predators~
docs.google.com/gview?a=v&q=cache:X4SxM1UprXgJ~
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1989244,00.html?xid=newsletter-daily

A July 2010 New York Times Magazine lead article "The End of Forgetting" presents the impossibility of erasing your posted past and moving on, although software is in the works to make internet postings time-limited before expiring and being erased.
nytimes.com/2010/07/25/magazine/25privacy-t2.html

Also read a fine article of one person's downward out-of-control journey into and out of Massive Online Games (MOG), Massive Multiplayer Online (MMO), Massive Multiplayer Online Games (MMOG) or Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games (MMORPG), like EverQuest (EQ), Final Fantasy XI, World of Warcraft and Happy Farm, are a subcategory of internet addiction. Links are also provided on warning signs of MMORPG addiction and how to overcome an MMORPG addiction.
kotaku.com/5384643/i-kept-playing--the-costs-of-my-gaming-addiction
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massively_multiplayer_online_game
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MMOGs
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiplayer_online_game
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Online_game
hubpages.com/hub/MMORPG-addiction
cryosphere.f2s.com/articles/games/ten-signs-of-mmorpg-addiction.html
exgamer.net/blog/?p=948
ocf.berkeley.edu/~jenchan/Conclusion.html
healthexpertadvice.org...Overcome-an-MMORPG-Addiction-257~
wikihow.com/Overcome-an-MMORPG-Addiction
docs.google...netaddiction.com...addiction_to_mmorpgs~

Playing Video Games—Advantages, disadvantages and strategies: Advantages of playing video games are promoting attention to detail, memorizing, sequencing and using strategies, along with improved eye-hand (visual-motor) coordination, visual perception (spatial awareness), aid in education and learning, encourage teamwork and cooperation, use of imagination, offer mentally challenging tasks to slow the effects of age-related cognitive decline, and providing entertainment children and adults can share. Disadvantages include video game addiction, lowered performance in school with neglected schoolwork and homework, decreased social interactions with family and friends, sleep deprivation and teaching acceptance of violent behavior in real life. Articles below outline numerous practical strategies to set appropriate limits on playing video games. Research shows that 8.5% of young video game players exhibit signs of addiction to gaming. An April 2010 article in The New York TImes entitled "For Pro Athletes, Practice That's All in the Thumbs" discusses how professional athletes in a wide range of sports say that playing video games improves their physical and mental skills, in part because the quality of the sports simulations have gotten so good. A January 2011 report of a two-year study of over 3,000 elementary and middle-school students in Singapore provided disturbing results on the associations between personality, gaming and future psychological disorders. It found that students with impulsive personalities and less empathy or social skills were more likely to become pathological addicted gamers by logging an average of 312 hours/week on their consoles, compared with 19 hours/week for other students as well as tending to be more aggressive and antisocial. Even more disturbing is that these pathological addictive gamers were at greater risk of developing depression, anxiety and social phobia two years later.
parenting.org/archive/discovery/parenting/2001-02/Feb02_video_games~
scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=video-games-by-prescription
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1909852,00.html
mothernature.com/Library/bookshelf/Books/50/116.cfm
bio-medicine.org...Almost-1-in-10-Young-Video-Game-Users-Addicted~
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_game
nytimes.com/2010/04/03/technology/03game.html?th&emc=th
news-medical.net...gaming-may-lead-to-mental...health-problems-for-kids~
parentdish.com...video-games-can-cause-mental-health-problems~
news.slashdot.org...Study-Links-Video-Games-and-Mental-Problems~
medicalnewstoday.com/articles/213929.php

U.S. Supreme Court struck down on First Amendment grounds a California law that barred the sale of violent video games to children18 and younger, according to a highly controversial June 2011 ruling. This ruling has been denounced by the Parents Television Council and the American Psychological Association.
outsidethebeltway....supreme-court-government-cannot-ban-violent-video-games~
games.ign.com/articles/117/1179191p1.html
nytimes.com/2011/06/28/opinion/28olson.html~
apa.org/research/action/games.aspx

Operating digital devices is associated with brain fatigue and deprives the brain of needed restful downtime—In the guise of refreshing and relaxing themselves, people are actually fatiguing and stressing themselves when overusing digital devices, according to research released in late August 2010.
nytimes.com/2010/08/25/technology/25brain.html

College / Early Adulthood: Risks and Prevention

College students have 40 percent less empathy than their counterparts of 20 or 30 years ago in the 1980's and 1990's: A University of Michigan study released in May 2010 analyzed data among almost 14,000 college students over the last 30 years and found the biggest drop in empathy following the year 2000 and that "College kids today are about 40 percent lower in empathy than their counterparts of 20 or 30 years ago, as measured by standard tests of this personality trait." The study was conducted by Sara Konrath, a researcher at the University of Michigan along with graduate student Edward O'Brian and undergraduate student Courtney Hsing. "Many people see the current group of college students—sometimes called 'Generation Me'—as one of the most self-centered, narcissistic, competitive, confident and individualistic in recent history," said Konrath, who is also affiliated with the University of Rochester Department of Psychiatry. "It's not surprising that this growing emphasis on the self is accompanied by a corresponding devaluation of others," O'Brien said.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100528081434.htm

College students exhibiting more severe psychological challenges in the last 10 years: Research findings released in August 2010 examined counseling records from 3,256 college students showed that in the last 10 years, university and college counseling services in the U.S. are reporting that the needs of students seeking services are escalating toward more sever psychological problems. During the years 1998 to 2009, the percentage of students with moderate to severe depression has gone from 34 to 41 percent. One possibility for the uptick in these figures according to head researcher John Guthman, Ph.D. might be due to more students entering college with pre-existing psychological problems. The study also found that the number of students on psychiatric medications increased more than 10 percentage points. On a positive note, the number of students who acknowledged that they had thought about suicide within two weeks of counseling intake declined from 26 percent in 1998 to 11 percent in 2009.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100812111053.htm
psychcentral.com...more-college-students-with-depression-anxiety~

Survey results from directors of 424 counseling college campus counseling centers conducted in Fall 2010 and released in April 2011 found that more students have severe psychological problems, increasing from 71% in the 2008-9 year to 77% in 2009-2010 year of respondents.
chronicle.com/article/article-content/126990...Chronicle:+Top+Stories~

Teen Birth Rate & Adolescents Research

Teen birth rate at Record Low in California (and Federal health officials announced that the U.S. teen birth rate has dropped to its lowest level in seven decades!) drawing upon the most current data from 2009, reports released in February 2011 show: The 2009 teen birth rate in California was less than half the rate in 1991 (32 births per 1,000 females teens age 15 to 19 compared with 71 births per 1,000 female teens). Federal health officials reported a new analysis showing significant decreases in U.S. teen birth rate across the majority of states and throughout all racial and ethnic groups from 2007 to 2009. The U.S. teen birth rate has dropped by 37 percent in the twenty years between 1991 and 2009. Increased sex education and birth control/contraceptive programs, the difficult economy, increasing abstinence and increased use of contraceptions are mentioned as ways to understand these findings.
latimesblogs.latimes.com...teen-pregnancy-record-low-rate-california~
sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article~
healthnews.com...pregnancy-childbirth/us-teen-birth-rate-declines-to-record-low~

36.2% of adolescents with any mental disorder receive services and only half with severe impairing mental disorders ever receive treatment, according to research results released in January 2011.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110118113451.htm
bmedreport.com/archives/22168
elsevier.com...authored_newsitem.cws_home/companynews05_01815~

Girls hit puberty earlier than ever (that is, precocious puberty), no one definitively understands this and there are lots of theories: According to 2010 research results, about 15% of American girls now begin puberty by age 7, with one in 10 Caucasian girls developing breasts by that age, twice the rate seen in a 1997 study, and among African-American girls 23% begin developing breasts by age 7. One report writer claims that in the last 30 years, the childhood of girls has been shortened by about a year and one-half, while another mentions that girls are being thrown into adolescence long before their brains are ready for the change, and this poses serious risks to their health. There is no evidence that boys are maturing any earlier. To put this all in context, in the 1840's, girls in Scandinavia didn't begin menstruating until age 16 or 17. As nutrition and living conditions improved, the age of first menstruation occurred two to three months earlier each decade. American girls were getting their periods at age 14 by 1900. An excerpt: "Though the age at which girls get their first period has continued to fall slowly since then, the age at which girls begin developing breasts has declined much more dramatically. Early puberty increases girls' odds of depression, drinking, drug use, eating disorders, behavioral problems and attempted suicide, according to the 2007 report. When these girls grow up, they face a higher risk of breast and uterine cancers, likely because they're exposed to estrogen for a longer period of time." Another source claims that while breast growth and other signs of puberty appear to be occurring with girls at a younger age, the average age of first menstrual period (at age 12) has remained essentially unchanged for both Caucasian and African American girls experts say. Another research study of 1,000 Danish children showed that between 1991 and 2006 the average age of breast development—the first sign of impending puberty in girls—has come down from 10.88 to 9.86 years. There seems to be some evidence that obesity is implicated in girls hitting puberty earlier since body fat is related to the production of sex hormones. Others point to hormones in so-called junk food and water that is messing with kids' biological clocks.
time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2009341,00.html
msnbc.msn.com/id/38600414/ns/health-kids_and_parenting/
...usatoday.com...girls-hit-puberty-earlier-than-ever-and-doctors-arent-sure-why~
dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-473584/Girls-entering-puberty-age--drugs-answer.html
telegraph.co.uk/health/7827533/Why-are-girls-reaching-puberty-younger.html
tlc.howstuffworks.com/family/earlier-girls-puberty.htm
parentmap.com/content/view/1077/337/
http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/girls-hitting-puberty-younger-obesity-study-article-1.201586
weightlosssurgerychannel.com...obese-girls-hitting-puberty-younger.html~
babble.com/kid/child-development/causes-early-onset-puberty-in-girls/

Watching risky behaviors increases people's inclination to do them, according to a meta-analysis published in February 2011. Researcher Peter Fischer, Ph.D. found that people playing video games that feature reckless driving and seeing media images of smoking, drinking and unprotected sex makes people more willing to engage in such risky behaviors. Moreover, the effect is stronger on people in the role of a race car driver compared with passively viewed media such as television shows or films. This connection between viewing risk-glorifying media and pursuing risky behavior is strongest for males age 14 to 29. Dr. Fischer advised parents who want their teens to avoid reckless driving that it would do best to keep video car racing games out of reach. Important news for parents!
apa.org/monitor/2011/05/risky-behaviors.aspx

Teenage brain development: Good judgment does not developmentally come on-line until age 25 at the earliest!—Dr. Jay Giedd, chief of brain imagining in the child psychiatry branch of NIMH, after over 13 years performing MRIs and studying the brains of more than 1,800 kids, concluded that the pre-frontal cortex—home of the "executive" functions of planning, setting priorities, organizing thoughts, suppressing impulses and weighing the consequences of one's actions—does not reach a level of genuine maturity until someone reaches their mid-twenties! This information about teen's good judgment not coming "on-line" in terms of brain development until the mid-twenties has wide-ranging implications in regard to the privileges parents and teachers offer teens. Several videos by Frances E. Jensen, M.D., senior assistant in Neurology at Children's Hospital Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School, help translate the most up-to-date research on the teen brain for the informed parent. A popular article in Parade magazine in late November 2010 provides some highlights of how the teenage brain functions and develops. Highly recommended. Forewarned is forearmed (and can help protect)!
choicesaz.org/resources/brain_development
thaliasthoughts.com/pb/wp_4641b6a0.html
linkedin.com/news...parade.com...news...-inside-the-teenage-brain~

Video of Dr. Jay Giedd: youtube.com/watch?v=GPMP68QP698&feature=related

Videos of Dr. Frances Jensen:
youtube.com/watch?v=RpMG7vS9pfw&feature=related

youtube.com/watch?v=0JRxwVpXFB0&feature=channel
youtube.com/watch?v=rG7VZKl375g&feature=channel

Long road to adulthood is growing even longer: The so-called perpetual adolescents that the baby boomers were thought to be are being completely outflanked by a growing body of research showing that the real Peter Pans (Puer Aeternus, Latin for "eternal boy", or simply puer, refers to an older man whose emotional life has remained at an adolescent level) are not the boomers, but the following generation of Millennials or Echo Boomers, with birth dates ranging somewhere from the early 1980's to the early 2000's. A June 2010 New York Times article stated: ""People between 20 and 34 are taking longer to finish their educations, establish themselves in careers, marry, have children and become financially independent," said Frank F. Furstenberg, who leads the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood, a team of scholars who have been studying this transformation."
nytimes.com/2010/06/13/us/13generations.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Y
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puer_aeternus
angelfire.com/hi/TheSeer/puer.html
buzzle.com/editorials/9-4-2005-76066.asp
jungny.com/lexicon.175/carl.jung.161.html

Five times as many of today's youth have serious psychological health issues than previous generations: A January 2010 article in the Los Angeles Times from the Associated Press reports that a new study found that in a sample of 77,576 students from 1938 to 2007 who took the personality test of ego functioning called the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), five times as many high school and college students are dealing with anxiety and other psychological challenges as youth of the same age who were studied in the Great Depression era. Two categories had an increase of six times as many scoring higher---hypomania, a measure of anxiety and unrealistic optimism (from 5 percent of students in 1938 to 31 percent in 2007) and depression (from 1 percent to 6 percent). The study also showed increases in "psychopathic deviation," which is loosely related to psychopathic behavior in a milder form and is defined as having trouble with authority and feeling as though the rules don't apply to you (from 5 percent in 1938 to 24 percent in 2007). Head researcher Twenge said that the most current numbers may even be low given all the students taking antidepressants and other psychotropic medications which help alleviate the symptoms the survey asks about. These are most troubling findings to say the least and clearly point to our youth experiencing serious pressures and stress.
latimes.com/news/nationworld...stressed-out-students~
 


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