Welcome to the archived web site of
Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. Psychologist (1950-2013)
California License No. PSY 10092
 
Specializing in Presence-Centered Therapy
balancing mind and heart, body and spirit

Now in memoriam - This website is no longer being updated

 


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Acknowledgment, Gratitude, Self-Compassion and Happiness


Presence / Ego-Mind / Self-Compassion | Blogs, Therapy Effectiveness, Telepsychology, Acknowledgment, Gratitude & Self-Compassion | Happiness Research, Articles and Relationship of Happiness to Money

Presence: Cost of Not Being Present / a Wandering Mind

Not being present, or a wandering mind, is associated with a lower mood: According to November 2010 research findings from Harvard University (published in Science as an article "A Wandering Mind Is an Unhappy mind" by Matthew Killingsworth & Dan Gilbert) tracking how frequently 2,250 U.S. adults reported their mind wandering and how their moods changed according, participants self-reported being significantly less happy when their minds wandered than when they were focused on the task at hand. Specifically people spend 46.9% of their lives thinking about something other than what they're actually doing. This is not only a quite inefficient and ineffective use of one's mind, it actually seems to make people unhappy. Thinking about the past or future, along with daydreaming, even about pleasant things, were consistently associated with a lower mood. The embedded videos provide an overview. There is really nothing like being present. Given that almost all studies are conducted with undergraduates attending universities in the western world, the use of an iPhone application in this study can help expand the traditional data set for research into happiness and many other topics. The iPhone application used in this research study was "TrackYourHappiness" and is found at TrackYourHappiness.org.
abcnews.go.com...wandering-mind-unhappy-mind-study-finds~
boston.com...mind_wandering_a_fact_of_life_study_says~

Carlos Castaneda: "Stopping the world" & "Not Doing"

"Stopping the world" and "Not-doing" are powerful approaches offered in the writing of anthropologist Carlos Castaneda. An article by Alan Gullette from a philosophy class in 1975 provides an excellent summary of these approaches. Jungian analyst Gary Toub also delves into "Stopping the World and Seeing" in his article "Stopping The World." Both are highly recommended as offering very helpful ways to see beyond the ego-mind, come to your senses and be who you truly are
alangullette.com/essays/philo/stopping.htm
cgjungpage.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view~
en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Carlos_Castaneda
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_Castaneda

Blogs: Beyond Ego

Blog by Luís Martins Simões entitled "Observe, Acknowledge and Accept Facts" explores the value of intuition and acknowledging "what is" in this moment, and witnessing the "ego" and letting it be, in being Who I AM. Recommended.
luismartinssimoes.com/2009/05/observe-acknowledge-and-accept-facts

"Ego-ing"—Author Peter Russell's IONS (Institute of Noetic Science) article "There Is No Such Thing as an Ego" points out that a separate individual self, some "thing" in the mind, simply does not exist. He strongly suggests that instead of using the term "ego" as a noun, implying some object or "thing," it is far more accurate and helpful to describe the thought of ego as a mental process by using the verb "ego-ing." An excerpt: "Rather than berate myself (or my imagined ego) when I notice myself caught up in egoic thinking, I can notice instead what is going on and step back from it. This doesn’t mean I have eliminated that way of thinking—it will surely return. But when it does, I can choose to step out of it again. Transcending the ego thus becomes an ongoing practice rather than a far-off goal."
noetic.org/blog/there-is-no-such-thing-as-an-ego

 


Presence / Ego-Mind / Self-Compassion | Blogs, Therapy Effectiveness, Telepsychology, Acknowledgment, Gratitude & Self-Compassion | Happiness Research, Articles and Relationship of Happiness to Money

Blogs: Psychology

Blog by Luís Martins Simões entitled "Observe, Acknowledge and Accept Facts" explores the value of intuition and acknowledging "what is" in this moment, and witnessing the "ego" and letting it be, in being Who I AM. Recommended.
luismartinssimoes.com/2009/05/observe-acknowledge-and-accept-facts

"Ego-ing"—Author Peter Russell's IONS (Institute of Noetic Science) article "There Is No Such Thing as an Ego" points out that a separate individual self, some "thing" in the mind, simply does not exist. He strongly suggests that instead of using the term "ego" as a noun, implying some object or "thing," it is far more accurate and helpful to describe the thought of ego as a mental process by using the verb "ego-ing." An excerpt: "Rather than berate myself (or my imagined ego) when I notice myself caught up in egoic thinking, I can notice instead what is going on and step back from it. This doesn’t mean I have eliminated that way of thinking—it will surely return. But when it does, I can choose to step out of it again. Transcending the ego thus becomes an ongoing practice rather than a far-off goal."
noetic.org/blog/there-is-no-such-thing-as-an-ego

 

The April 2008 ScienceDaily article "Is Happiness Having What You Want, Wanting What You Have, Or Both?" concludes "The researchers found that people who want more of what they have tend to be happier than those who want less of what they have. However, people who have more of what they want tend to be happier than those who have less of what they want."
sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/04/080428104537.htm

Therapy Effectiveness Research Findings

2009 research shows that short-term psychological therapy could be 32 times more cost effective at making you happy than simply obtaining more money—Reseachers compared large data sets where 1000s of people had reported on their well-being and at how well-being changed due to therapy in regard to getting sudden increases in income. They found that a 4 month course of psychological therapy had a large effect on well-being and showed that the costs of the therapy would take a pay increase of 32 times that amount to achieve an equivalent increase in well-being. So this research demonstrated that psychological therapy could be 32 times more cost effective at making you happy than simply obtaining more money. Chris Boyce, the lead researcher on the article, states, "Often the importance of money for improving our well-being and bringing greater happiness is vastly over-valued in our societies. The benefits of having good mental health, on the other hand, are often not fully appreciated and people do not realise the powerful effect that psychological therapy, such as non-directive counselling, can have on improving our well-being."
sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091120084613.htm

Psychotherapy reduces repeat ER trips—Emergency room "intensive, short-term dynamic psychotherapy" by a staff psychologist provided relief to three out of four patients whose physical symptoms have no medical explanation: Research published in November 2009 and released in January 2010 by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation addressed patients arriving at the emergency department of a Health Sciences Centre in Halifax with chest pain that doctors could find no physical reason for it after a barrage of tests. In an average treatment course of 3.8 sessions, in which the person recognized the link between their physical symptoms and their stress or emotions, resulted in a 69 per cent drop in repeat visits to the emergency room and hospital visits dropped from an average of almost 4.6 visits a year to 1.4 visits a year. An 80 per cent drop in panic attacks resulted from a single interview in many cases. Dr. Allan Abbass, director for the Centre, said that for every 100 people seen by the staff psychologist, there will be 300 fewer emergency visits a year, which adds up to a huge savings and reduction in unnecessary tests. Also patients reporting a high degree of satisfaction.
Abstract of article: cjem-online.ca/v11/n6/p529

Also read Dr. Friedman's compilation of research on the benefits of effects of therapy: "Research on the Effectiveness of Therapy and How Therapy Can Change Brain Structure"
willjoelfriedman.com/articles/articMind-Effectiveness.html

Telepsychology / Telemedicine

Obtaining therapy via teleconference is just as effective as face-to-face sessions: March 2010 research shows that that the teletherapy participants and the control group receiving face-to-face therapy equally benefited from their therapy according to a study by Stéphane Guay, a psychiatry professor at the Université de Montréal. He also cites previous studies showing that phobia therapy via teleconferencing was just as effective as face-to-face contact.
sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100323121759.htm
psychcentral.com...teletherapy-for-ptsd-found-effective~

Telepsychology is on the rise: The March 2010 issue of Monitor on Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that psychologists are increasingly using telephone and e-mail to provide services including psychotherapy, counseling, consulting and supervision—E-mail use has more than tripled among practicing psychologists between 2000 and 2008 with about 10 percent of providers using it weekly or more in 2008. Practitioners' use of videoconferencing increased from 2 to 10 percent during the same time period. All data were from the 2008 APA (American Psychological Association) Psychology Health Service Provider Survey.
apa.org/monitor/2010/03/telepsychology.aspx

Acknowledgment of Yourself and Others

Article "Connect With Your Strengths" by Self-Care Coach Linda Dessau supports self-acknowledgment
currentliving.com/categories/articles/dessau/connect.strengths.shtml

Article "Positive Thinking - Acknowledging Others" by Wendy St.Germain looks at how showing interest in other people helps them "step out of the thought process of the problem," is "the equivalent of a momentary meditation," and helps all parties be uplifted.
ezinearticles.com/?Positive-Thinking---Acknowledging-Others&id=1277568

Gratitude: Benefits to Health

Article "Psychological Research: Gratitude--Positive Psychology in Practice From Studies on Happiness" gives a helpful introduction to how gratitude is associated with good health along with practical ways to bring it into your daily life and work. Researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky's twelve specific activities for intentionally raising happiness are also summarized.

A 2009 article summarizes recent research by Tod Kashdan published online in the Journal of Psychology showed that women are much more likely to feel and express gratitude than men. He names meaningful relationships, gratitude, and living in the present moment as the three elements essential for creating happiness and meaning in life.
esciencenews.com/articles/2009/03/13/...key.happiness.gratitude~

Article "Counting Your Blessings: How Gratitude Improves Your Health" summarizes results of research by Robert Emmons that found that those who practice grateful thinking "reap emotional, physical and interpersonal benefits." Further, people who regularly keep a gratitude journal report fewer illness symptoms, feel better about their lives as a whole, and are more optimistic about the future. Five simple practical actions are presented to increase the level of gratitude in your life. Another article by University of California, Davis professor of psychology Robert Emmons presents "The New Science of Gratitude" and highlights from his research project on gratitude and thankfulness. Also see the 2007 interview of Dr. Emmons
cfidsselfhelp.org/library/counting-your-blessings-how-gratitude-improves~
gratitudepower.net/science.htm
sharpbrains.com/blog/2007/11/29/robert-emmons-on-the-positive~

Several articles review the beneficial results of cultivating gratitude from "positive psychology" researchers
women.webmd.com/features/gratitute-health-boost
nytimes.com/2009/11/18/books/18book.html?_r=1&th&emc=thSeveral

Grateful People Are Happier and Healthier: A growing body of research suggests that maintaining an attitude of gratitude can improve psychological, emotional and physical well-being.
online.wsj.com/article~

The Summer 2007 issue of the magazine Greater Good published by the University of California, Berkeley provides PDF downloads of four articles from a fairly recent symposium on gratitude
greatergood.berkeley.edu/greatergood/archive/2007summer

Compassion for Yourself / Self-Compassion

Self-Compassion website is a wonderful resource to aid the development of self-compassion, defined by Kristin Neff, Ph.D., Associate Professor in Human Development at the University of Texas at Austin, as having the three components of self-kindness, common humanity and mindfulness. In other words, self-compassion is extending compassion to one's self in instances of perceived inadequacy, failure, or general suffering. See the videos by Kristin Neff, Ph.D. and Duke University Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience Mark Leary, Ph.D. that help clarify the difference between self-compassion and self-esteem. All resources well worth exploring in depth.
self-compassion.org
psych-it.com.au/Psychlopedia/article.asp?id=174
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-compassion
physorg.com/news98466411.html
annettecolby.com/blog/2009/04/20/how-to-increase-self-compassion~
psychologytoday.com/blog/the-compassion-chronicles/200805/quieting~
innerbonding.com/show-article/851/self-judgment-versus~

Video: youtube.com/watch?v=tAifaBhh2xo
youtube.com/watch?v=3OdWeqCJGdc&feature=related

Go easy on yourself in the area of self-compassion—how kindly people view themselves, according to a February 2011 New York Times article reviews a new wave of research.In the article it is mentioned that Dr. Neff has a new book being published in March 2011 called Self-Compassion: Stop Beating Yourself Up and Leave Insecurity Behind.
nytimes.com...go-easy-on-yourself-a-new-wave-of-research-urges~


Presence / Ego-Mind / Self-Compassion | Blogs, Therapy Effectiveness, Telepsychology, Acknowledgment, Gratitude & Self-Compassion | Happiness Research, Articles and Relationship of Happiness to Money

Happiness: Research Findings are Revealing

Different views and research on happiness from Wikipedia are intriguing, as is a recent Time article on the paradox of happiness, including the notion that happiness cannot be acquired directly, only indirectly or as a side benefit of living a satisfying, fulfilling, contributive and inspiring life. A July 2010 research article drawing upon worldwide data found that material prosperity predicts life evaluation (i.e., "...a reflective judgment on people's lives compared with what they want them to be"), whereas psychosocial prosperity predicts positive feeling (such as the fulfillment of psychological needs like learning, using one's skills, respect, autonomy, and the ability to count on others in an emergency).
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happiness
time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1938719,00.html?iid=tsmodule
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox_of_hedonism
abstractfactory.blogspot.com/2003/10/happiness-paradox.html
pellebilling.com/2009/06/the-paradox-of-declining-female-had
medicine.journa...wealth-and-happiness-across-the-world-material-prosperity-predicts-life-evaluation-whereas-psychosocial-prosperity-predicts-positive-feeling~
eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-07/uoia-cmb062810.php
physorg.com/news197125082.html

American's happiest man and the 2010 Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index: The New York Times contracted with Gallup to come up with a statistical composite for the happiest man in America. Gallup's answer released March 2011 was he's a tall, Asian-American, observant Jew who is at least 65 and married, has children, lives in Hawaii, runs his own business and has a household income of more than $120,000 a year. Actually a few phone calls later...they came up with Alvin Wong, a 5-foot-10, 69-year-old, Chinese-American, Kosher-observing Jew, who's married with children and lives in Honolulu, runs his own health care management business and earns more than $120,000 a year. Indeed, Mr. Wong said he was a very happy person and credited "my life philosophy is, if you can't laugh at yourself, life is going to be pretty terrible for you." Also look at the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index to find the results over the last three years of calling 1,000 randomly selected American adults each day and asking them about their emotional status, work satisfaction, eating habits, illnesses, stress levels and other indicators of their quality of life. Click on the two boxes on the left side to see some of the most interesting findings.
nytimes.com/2011/03/06/weekinreview/06happy.html
well-beingindex.com/

Experiences create greater happiness than possessions: A recent poll (late December 2009) shows that people are putting shared experiences with family and friends ahead of buying goods and services. Psychologists have long said that shared experiences lead to more long-term happiness, as shown in a CNNhealth.com article from February 2009. Happiness polls show that most Americans (84%) are "very satisfied" with their lives according to a December,2007 Gallup Poll. Family, friends and greater education are linked to happiness more than money according to a Harris Interactive poll from April 2009. While this may only end up being a short-term blip on the radar, it also could signal a shift in direction for how people value sharing their lives with loved ones and friends over material things.
nytimes.com...business/economy/03experience.html~
cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/02/10/happiness.possessions/index.html
mayoclinic.com/health/happiness/MY00158
gallup.com/poll/103483/most-americans-very-satisfied-their-personal-lives.aspx
hispanicmpr.com...friends-education-linked-to-happiness-more-than-money~

Happiness as people usually think if it—the experience of pleasure or positive feelings--is far less important to physical health than the type of well-being that comes from engaging in meaningful activity, according to research findings released in March 2011: Thus the most recent evidence suggests that people who give their attention and activity to living with a sense of purpose as they age are more likely to remain cognitively intact, have better psychological/mental health and live longer than people who focus on achieving feelings of happiness.
online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704893604576200471545379388.html

Happy people live longer, February 2011 research published in Science finds: Social scientists Diener and Chan showed that many kind of studies, using different methods, conclude that happiness has a positive causal effect on longevity and physiological health. An excerpt: "For example, a meta-analysis based on 24 studies estimated that happy people live 14% longer than persons who report that they are unhappy. In a survey of people living in industrial countries, happier people enjoy an increased longevity of between 7.5 and 10 years. Happier people are also less likely to commit suicide, and they are less often the victims of accidents."
sciencemag.org/content/331/6017/542.summary
thehappinessinstitute.com/blog/article.aspx?c=3&a=2808

Degree of one's charity depends on happiness more than wealth: A Gallup poll released in September 2010 reveals that it's not money that buys happiness so much as giving does. Three key charitable acts were surveyed in 153 countries with some countries being very stingy in giving (e.g., former Soviet bloc nations) and others being very generous in one area while stingy in another (e.g., Liberians giving very little money to charity or religious groups and being the world's most generous people in helping strangers). The top ten countries based on the highest percentages of people who answered yes to all three categories were: Australia (57%); New Zealand (57%), Ireland (56%), Canada (56%), Switzerland (55%), USA (55%), Netherlands (54%), United Kingdom (53%), Sri Lanka (53%) and Austria (52%). The survey found that overall 20% of the world's population had volunteered time in the month prior to interview, 30% had volunteered their time, and 65% had helped a stranger. Further it found that 60% of Americans had donated money to an organization, 39% had volunteered their time, and 65% had helped a stranger. One way to understand the findings is that the survey was conducted only in urban areas, where generosity is less than in rural areas of the U.S.
Gallup-poll-Degree-of-one-s-charity-depends-on-happiness-more-than-wealth~

Can Seeking Happiness make People Unhappy? Under certain circumstances, such as in positive contexts in which expectations for happiness are high and it's difficult to attribute failure to be happy to one's circumstances, valuing happiness may be self-defeating, leading people to value happiness more made them feel less happy, according to an article published in May 2011 in the highly regarded journal Emotion. Another article (in press), "A Dark Side of Happiness? How, When, and Why Happiness Is Not Always Good" by Gruber, Mauss and Tamir provides the research review and theory for the later research paper.
optimalfunctioning.com...can-seeking-happiness-make-people-unhappy...~

Original Articles:
Mauss_et_al_valuing_happiness_in press.pdf
GruberMaussTamir_PPS_in_press.pdf

Boomers are happy and suicidal in midlife according to recent research findings: The boomers generation starting at age 50 showed a sharp rise in the level of happiness from self-report data according to a 2008 Gallup telephone poll. At the same time, based on 2007 data collected from the latest federal Center for Disease Control and Prevention survey of violent deaths in 16 states, results found for the second year in a row that the group between ages 45 and 54 had the highest rate of suicide, a surprising reverse of historical trends. Past trends show that traditionally people over 80 had the highest rates. Also since 2003, the rates for the elderly and for 16- to 19-year-olds, another vulnerable age group, have lowered. Opinions are offered to help understand these findings.
nytimes.com/2010/06/13/weekinreview/13cohen.html

A May 2009 Boston Globe article entitled "Perfectly Happy" presents a balanced overview of happiness as a concept and key research regarding happiness, including "the best known 1978 study by the psychologists Philip Brickman, Dan Coates, and Ronnie Janoff-Bulman. They compared the self-reported happiness levels of lottery winners, paralyzed accident victims (both paraplegics and quadriplegics), and people who were neither. What they found was that lottery winners didn't report themselves appreciably happier than the control group, and while the paralyzed did report themselves less happy than the controls, the difference was not as dramatic as the researchers had expected. More recent and rigorous studies have yielded results broadly similar: getting married or getting a raise or a new house all give a boost to our happiness, but eventually we drop to levels near where we were before." Recommended. A March 2010 article in The New Yorker magazine reviews recent books on happiness and what policymakers can learn from happiness research. A late August 2010 article in Financial Times summarizes research findings into "The seven secrets of a happy life", including: 1) money buys you little happiness; 2) friends are worth more than a new Ferrari; 3) winning the lottery won't make you instantly happy; 4) losing your job makes you unhappy—but less so when others have too; 5) fat friends make you happier than thin ones; 6) divorce can make you happy; and 7) happiness is contagious. All recommended.
boston.com/bostonglobe/ideas/articles/2009/05/10/perfectly_happy/~
newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2010/03/22/100322crbo_books_kolbert~
ft.com/cms/s/2/9a4d4a64-b0b9-11df-8c04-00144feabdc0.html

Also peruse the original research article "Lottery Winners and Accident Victims: Is Happiness Relative?" from the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (1978).
docs.google.com...lottery+winners+and+accident+victims~

The relationship between money and happiness is explored in several articles with predictable and surprising results. September 2010 research findings from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School analyzing responses of 450,000 Americans polled by Gallup and Heathways in 2008 and 2009 revealed that 85% felt happy every day regardless of their annual income, nearly 40% also reported feeling stressed (not mutually exclusive with happiness), and 24% had feelings of sadness. Further, there are actually two types of happiness: 1) your changeable, day-to-day mood (whether you're stressed or blue or feeling emotionally sound; and 2) a deeper satisfaction you feel about the way your life is going. Researchers found that people who make $75,000 a year or more say they feel their life is working out on the whole (happiness # 2 above), although it doesn't make them any happier or more jovial in the mornings. The report found that no matter how much more than $75,000 a year people make, they don't report any greater degree of happiness.
psychologytoday.com/blog/the-good-life/200806/money-and-happiness
usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/maney/~
money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/moneymag_archive/2006/08/01~
princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S15/15/09S18/index.xml~
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happiness_economics
hbswk.hbs.edu/item/5944.html
webmd.com/sex-relationships/guide/20061101/sex-better-than-money~
time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2016291,00.html~

World's happiest countries are the least religious: An August 2010 report by the Religious News Service announced that among the five happiest countries—Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands, three of these five nations are among the top 10 least religious nations in the world according to a Gallup poll.
utne.com...the-worlds-happiest-countries-are-the-least-religious~

Happiness: Articles

An August 2010 article in The New York Times looks at "emotional efficiency" (or reaping the most happiness for your money) and how it is aided by uplifting experiences which trump material objects in terms of happiness and moving from conspicuous consumption to calculated consumption.
nytimes.com/2010/08/08/business/08consume.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&th&emc=th

Having a sister is associated with happiness: An October 2010 essay by linguist Deborah Tannen cites a study that found that adolescents who have a sister are less likely to report such feelings as "I am unhappy, sad or depressed" and "I feel like no one loves me." Other studies come to a similar conclusion that having a sister makes you happier. She speculates in a new book that it points to talk or conversation itself, that is, having longer talks, sometimes about feelings / one's personal life, and sometimes about the meaningful details of daily living.
nytimes.com/2010/10/26/health/26essay.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Beyond Happiness is "Well-Being" or "Flourishing": A May 2011 New York Times article points beyond happiness. Martin Seligman, Ph.D., the psychologist who was a co-founder of the subfield positive psychology and who now regrets that title since that concept has certain limitations, is looking at a feeling of accomplishment in contributing to what the ancient Greeks called eudaimonia, meaning "well-being" or "flourishing." Dr. Seligman's new book Flourish explores this concept and he created his own acronym, Perma, for what he defines as the five crucial elements of well-being, each pursued for its own sake: positive emotion, engagement (the feeling of being lost in a task), relationships, meaning and accomplishment. Economist Arthur Brooks in his book Gross National Happiness (2008) asserts that what is crucial to well-being is not how much money you make, not how cheerful you feel, but rather the meaning you find in life and your "earned success"—the belief that you created value in your life or others' lives.
nytimes.com/2011/05/17/science/17tierney.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha210

Interview with Daniel Kahneman on Wellness (December 16, 2010): Psychologist (and Nobel laureate in economics) Daniel Kahneman of Princeton has taken the lead in studying a specific type of emotional and behavioral prediction called "Behavioral Economics." "Prospect theory," developed by researchers Amos Tversky and Daniel Kahneman, allows one to describe how people make choices in situations where they have to decide between alternatives that involve risk. Two key findings are "Loss Aversion" or people's tendency to strongly prefer (by two times) avoiding losses to acquiring gains, along with the "Endowment Effect" or people often demanding much more to give up an object than they would be willing to pay to acquire it. The interview is a remarkable opportunity to hear from one of the most influential and articulate researchers in the field of wellness. In the interview he is asked about the most important wellbeing-related finding from his research and he mentions the 2010 research finding that 'experienced happiness' in the United States levels off around $70,000 - $75,000 income per annum, while life satisfaction continues to go on increasing.
bit.ly/KenPopeDanKahnemanInterview

The article "Are You Happy?" from the April 3, 2008 issue of The New York Review of Books reviews several prominent books on happiness in a thoughtful intelligent discussion
nybooks.com/articles/21197

Happiness and Money

The relationship between money and happiness is explored in several articles with predictable and surprising results. September 2010 research findings from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School analyzing responses of 450,000 Americans polled by Gallup and Heathways in 2008 and 2009 revealed that 85% felt happy every day regardless of their annual income, nearly 40% also reported feeling stressed (not mutually exclusive with happiness), and 24% had feelings of sadness. Further, there are actually two types of happiness: 1) your changeable, day-to-day mood (whether you're stressed or blue or feeling emotionally sound; and 2) a deeper satisfaction you feel about the way your life is going. Researchers found that people who make $75,000 a year or more say they feel their life is working out on the whole (happiness # 2 above), although it doesn't make them any happier or more jovial in the mornings. The report found that no matter how much more than $75,000 a year people make, they don't report any greater degree of happiness.
psychologytoday.com/blog/the-good-life/200806/money-and-happiness
usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/maney/~
money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/moneymag_archive/2006/08/01~
princeton.edu/main/news/archive/S15/15/09S18/index.xml~
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happiness_economics
hbswk.hbs.edu/item/5944.html
webmd.com/sex-relationships/guide/20061101/sex-better-than-money~
time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2016291,00.html~

World's happiest countries are the least religious: An August 2010 report by the Religious News Service announced that among the five happiest countries—Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands, three of these five nations are among the top 10 least religious nations in the world according to a Gallup poll.
utne.com...the-worlds-happiest-countries-are-the-least-religious~
 


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