Welcome to the archived web site of
Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. Psychologist (1950-2013)
California License No. PSY 10092
 
Specializing in Presence-Centered Therapy
balancing mind and heart, body and spirit

Now in memoriam - This website is no longer being updated
While Dr. Friedman is no longer with us, there are still many helpful resources on his site. Articles and resource links have been relocated to the top. His family hopes you might find them helpful. But since this site is no longer being updated, some links may no longer work.

 


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Articles by Dr. Friedman (except where noted otherwise)

Categorized by Process | Topic

From His Book | Meditations For Life | The Flow of Money, Business and Innovation | Transpersonal/Mind-Body | Approaches, Worldview and Will-isms

Skills For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free | Feeling, Thought, Communication & Action

Strategies/Distinctions For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free

Awakening Stories/Metaphors For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free | The Way It Is

Holiday Family Gatherings | Cartoons, Jokes and Humor | Poems and Quotes | Song Lyrics, Wit and Wisdom

Browse excerpts from Dr. Friedman's forthcoming book
Awakening to Sanity: Being Sane in an Insane World—A Traveler's Guide

How Socrates' Students Chose Themselves

An Imagined, Adapted Story—Source Unknown

© 2011 by Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. All Rights Reserved Worldwide.

An excerpt from his forthcoming book
Awakening to Sanity: Being Sane in an Insane World
—A Traveler's Guide
 

Only one who bursts with enthusiasm do I instruct,
Only one who bubbles with excitement do I enlighten.
—Confucius
 

Socrates, an Athenian teacher and philosopher, was known for his inquiring and intelligent mind, especially in philosophical dialogue. Many young men aspired to study with him. In order to dissuade the less than serious from poorly engaging his time, intellect and life, he persuaded several close associates to be highly confrontational with applicants. These associates would declare Socrates a most difficult person and warned that the studies would be a laborious and frustrating experience. Most students declined.

Anyone still desiring to study with Socrates would have a one-on-one meeting in which Socrates would greet the student and suggest they take a walk in order to discuss what brought the person to study with him. During these walks, Socrates listened and observed. He regularly put his hand on the student's shoulder, as teachers did in those days. Invariably Socrates led his companion close to a lake, and then into it. The students seldom protested, thinking surely Socrates must know what he is doing.

At some moment, with lightning speed and no warning, Socrates would grasp the student's shoulders and thrust him under the water, holding him there as the student struggled to no avail. Finally, Socrates would let go and the aspirant would bob up to the surface, gasping for air, flailing his hands, outraged, frightened and thoroughly confused. Many would-be students immediately fled. To those who remained, Socrates announces, "When you want to know what I know as much as you want breath and life itself, then come back and see me." Most of these candidates did not return.

Occasionally a brave survivor would return, go directly to Socrates, and say, "I want to know what you know." Only then did the master know the student was serious and replied, "We'll see." At any given time Socrates never had more than a small cadre of highly dedicated students. It was always up to the student to take the plunge into his core and make the commitment. Some left after a short time. The most determined remained for years and were transformed in choosing to remain engaged in a highly demanding process of critical thinking as well as looking, finding and being Truth.

What one values is self-evident—what resources of time, energy, activity, are present.


George Demont Otis     Santa Venetian Marsh

 
© Copyright 2013 by Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D.
 
 


Home | Dedication/Orientation | Articles by Dr. Friedman | Video and Audio Clips | Annotated Resource Links | Psychology Professionals

Dr. Will’s Perspective on Practicing Psychology: Dr. Friedman's Practice | Dr. Friedman's Approach | Therapeutic Purposes | Credentials | Experience | Brochures | Interview | Events and Workshops | Website Disclaimer | Contact