Welcome to the archived web site of
Will Joel Friedman, Ph.D. Psychologist (1950-2013)
California License No. PSY 10092
 
Specializing in Presence-Centered Therapy
balancing mind and heart, body and spirit

Now in memoriam - This website is no longer being updated
While Dr. Friedman is no longer with us, there are still many helpful resources on his site. Articles and resource links have been relocated to the top. His family hopes you might find them helpful. But since this site is no longer being updated, some links may no longer work.

 


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Articles by Dr. Friedman (except where noted otherwise)

Categorized by Process | Topic

From His Book | Meditations For Life | The Flow of Money, Business and Innovation | Transpersonal/Mind-Body | Approaches, Worldview and Will-isms

Skills For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free | Feeling, Thought, Communication & Action

Strategies/Distinctions For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free

Awakening Stories/Metaphors For Life: The Core Playing Field | Free the Ego, and You Are Free | The Way It Is

Holiday Family Gatherings | Cartoons, Jokes and Humor | Poems and Quotes | Song Lyrics, Wit and Wisdom

Song Lyrics, Wit and Wisdom

The World According to World-Class Satirists:

Rabelais, Voltaire, Jonathan Swift, Moliere,
Henry Fielding, Oscar Wilde & George Bernard Shaw

A select number of authors throughout the ages have been the world-class satirists to hold humanity's feet to the fire of their stinging, truth-revealing prose and play-writing. While some of the language may be a little antiquated, the points being made are timeless.


François Rabelais (c. 1494 -1553) was a major French Renaissance writer and author of the classic Gargantua and Pantagruel, was also a doctor and Renaissance humanist. He wrote of fantasy, the grotesque, satire, and bawdy jokes and songs.

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Everything comes in time to those who can wait.

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Half the world does not know how the other half lives.

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How can I govern others, who can't even govern myself?

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I have known many who could not when they would, for they had not done it when they could.

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If you wish to avoid seeing a fool you must first break your looking glass.

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Ignorance is the mother of all evils.

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It is my opinion that time brings all things to fruition; by time all things are made plain; time is the father of truth.

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Misery is the company of Lawsuits.

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Nature abhors a vacuum.

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Tell the truth and shame the devil.

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One falls to the ground in trying to sit on two stools.

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We always long for the forbidden things, and desire what is denied us.

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There is no truer cause of unhappiness amongst men than, where naturally expecting charity and benevolence, they receive harm and vexation.

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It is folly to put the plough in front of the oxen.

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How do you know antiquity was foolish? How do you know the present is wise? Who made it foolish? Who made it wise?

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If the skies fall, one may hope to catch larks

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The farce is finished. I go to seek a vast perhaps.

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I have nothing, I owe a great deal, and the rest I leave to the poor. [His one-line will]

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I go to seek a Great Perhaps. [His last words]


Jonathan Swift (1667 - 1745) was an Irish writer and probably the foremost prose satirist in the English language and well known for his poetry and essays. He is best known for writing Gulliver's Travels.

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It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.

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Very few men, properly speaking, live at present, but are providing to live another time.

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May you live all the days of your life.

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Vision: the art of seeing things invisible.

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No wise man ever wished to be younger.

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One of the best rules in conversation is, never to say a thing which any of the company can reasonably wish had been left unsaid.

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When a true genius appears in this world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him.

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There's none so blind as they that won't see.

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Nothing is so hard for those who abound in riches to conceive how others can be in want.

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Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody else has thought.

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Laws are like cobwebs, which may catch small flies but which let wasps and hornets break through.

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Men are happy to be laughed at for their humor, but not for their folly.

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As blushing will sometimes make a whore pass for a virtuous woman, so modesty may make a fool seem a man of sense.

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Positiveness is a good quality for preachers and speakers because, whoever shares his thoughts with the public will convince them as he himself appears convinced.

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A loss, of which we are ignorant, is no loss.

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The worthiest people are the most injured by slander, as is the best fruit which the birds have been pecking at.

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There is nothing in this world constant but inconstancy.

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An excuse is a lie guarded.

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He was a bold man that first ate an oyster.

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And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.

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We have just enough religion to make us hate, but not enough to make us love one another.

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Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

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That was excellently observed', say I, when I read a passage in an author, where his opinion agrees with mine. When we differ, there I pronounce him to be mistaken.

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Undoubtedly, philosophers are in the right when they tell us that nothing is great or little otherwise than by comparison.

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I heartily hate and detest that animal called man, although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.

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Satire is a sort of glass wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own; which is the chief reason for that kind reception it meets with in the world, and that so very few are offended with it.


Jean Baptiste Poquelin, also known as Moliere (1622- 1673), was a French actor, dramatist/playwright as well as one of the greatest writers/masters of comedy in Western literature.

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The duty of comedy is to correct men by amusing them.

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As the purpose of comedy is to correct the vices of men, I see no reason why anyone should be exempt.

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Things only have the value that we give them.

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It is not only for what we do that we are held responsible, but also for what we do not do.

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I assure you that a learned fool is more foolish than an ignorant fool.

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A wise man is superior to any insults which can be put upon him, and the best reply to unseemly behavior is patience and moderation.

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Don't appear so scholarly, pray. Humanize your talk, and speak to be understood.

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Esteem must be founded on preference: to hold everyone in high esteem is to esteem nothing.


George Demont Otis     Trees in the Evening Light

Oh, I may be devout, but I am human all the same.

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One ought to look a good deal at oneself before thinking of condemning others.

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One should eat to live, not live to eat.

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People of quality know everything without ever having learned anything.

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Reason is not what decides love.

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The more we love our friends, the less we flatter them; it is by excusing nothing that pure love shows itself.

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Unreasonable haste is the direct road to error.

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A little inaccuracy sometimes saves a ton of explanation.

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That must be wonderful; I have no idea of what it means.

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To live without loving is not really to live.

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The trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit.

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People can be induced to swallow anything, provided it is sufficiently seasoned with praise.

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Nearly all men die of their remedies, and not of their illnesses.

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I prefer an accommodating vice to an obstinate virtue.

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Pretense is the overrating of any kind of knowledge we pretend to.

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The latter part of a wise person's life is occupied with curing the follies, prejudices and false opinions they contracted earlier.

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Where I am not understood, it shall be concluded that something very useful and profound is couched underneath.


Henry Fielding (1707 - 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist, best known for authoring Tom Jones, who was known for his rich earthly satire and humor.

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Adversity is the trial of principle. Without it a man hardly knows whether he is honest or not.

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Commend a fool for his wit, or a rogue for his honesty and he will receive you into his favor.

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Flattery is never so agreeable as to our blind side; commend a fool for his wit, or a knave for his honesty, and they will receive you into their bosoms.

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Conscience - the only incorruptible thing about us.

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Guilt has very quick ears to an accusation.

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Make money your god and it will plague you like the devil.

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Some folks rail against other folks, because other folks have what some folks would be glad of.

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Worth begets in base minds, envy; in great souls, emulation.

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Fashion is the science of appearance, and it inspires one with the desire to seem rather than to be.

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The prudence of the best heads is often defeated by the tenderness of the best hearts.

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He that can heroically endure adversity will bear prosperity with equal greatness of soul; for the mind that cannot be dejected by the former is not likely to be transported with the later.

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When I'm not thanked at all, I'm thanked enough; I've done my duty, and I've done no more.

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Great joy, especially after a sudden change of circumstances, is apt to be silent, and dwells rather in the heart than on the tongue.

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But me no buts.

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A good heart will, at all times, betray the best head in the world.

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A strenuous soul hates cheap success.

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Habit hath so vast a prevalence over the human mind that there is scarce anything too strange or too strong to be asserted of it. The story of the miser who, from long accustoming to cheat others, came at last to cheat himself, and with great delight and triumph picked his own pocket of a guinea to convey to his hoard, is not impossible or improbable.

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Affectation proceeds from one of these two causes,--vanity or hypocrisy; for as vanity puts us on affecting false characters, in order to purchase applause; so hypocrisy sets us on an endeavor to avoid censure, by concealing our vices under an appearance of their opposite virtues.


George Demont Otis     Spring Sleepy Hollow

As a great part of the uneasiness of matrimony arises from mere trifles, it would be wise in every young married man to enter into an agreement with his wife, that in all disputes of this kind the party who was most convinced they were right should always surrender the victory. By which means both would be more forward to give up the cause.

*

As it is the nature of a kite to devour little birds, so it is the nature of some minds to insult and tyrannize over little people; this being the means which they use to recompense themselves for their extreme servility and condescension to their superiors; for nothing can be more reasonable than that slaves and flatterers should exact the same taxes on all below them which they themselves pay to all above them.

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As they suspect a man in the city who is ostentatious of his riches, so should the woman he who makes the most noise of her virtue.

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It is admirably remarked, by a most excellent writer, that zeal can no more hurry a man to act in direct opposition to itself than a rapid stream can carry a boat against its own current.

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Superstition renders a man a fool, and skepticism makes him mad.

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The greatest part of mankind labor under one delirium or another; and Don Quixote differed from the rest, not in madness, but the species of it. The covetous, the prodigal, the superstitious, the libertine, and
the coffee-house politician, are all Quixotes in their several ways.

The slander of some people is as great a recommendation as the praise of others.

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We should not be too hasty in bestowing either our praise or censure on mankind, since we shall often find such a mixture of good and evil in the same character, that it may require a very accurate judgment and a very elaborate inquiry to determine on which side the balance turns.

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Wicked companions invite us to hell.


Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde [Oscar Wilde] (1854 -1900) was an Irish writer, poet, and prominent aesthete. He is mainly remembered for his epigrams and plays, especially for The Importance of Being Earnest, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Lady Windermere's Fan, and An Ideal Husband. He was quite the wit and bon vivant of his day, or any for that matter.

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A cynic is a man who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing.

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Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing. [The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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I can believe anything provided it is incredible.

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There are only two tragedies in life: one is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.

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We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. [Lady Windermere's Fan]

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A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.

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Life is not complex. We are complex. Life is simple, and the simple thing is the right thing.

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I love to talk about nothing it's the only thing I know anything about.

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Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever they go.

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The play was a great success, but the audience was a total failure.

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This wallpaper is dreadful, one of us will have to go.

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Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.

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I beg your pardon I didn't recognize you - I've changed a lot.

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One should always be a little improbable.

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To become a spectator of one's own life is to escape the suffering of life.

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An idea that is not dangerous is unworthy of being called an idea at all.

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We teach people how to remember, we never teach them how to grow.

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The aim of life is self-development. To realize one's nature perfectly-that is what each of us is here for.

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Misfortunes one can endure-they come from outside, they are accidents. But to suffer for one's own faults-ah!-there is the sting of life. [Lady Windermere's Fan]

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Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth.

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If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.

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We are each our own devil, and we make this world our hell.

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Disobedience, in the eyes of any one who has read history, is [hu]man's original virtue. It is through disobedience that progress has been made, through disobedience and through rebellion.

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I like persons better than principles, and I like persons with no principles better than anything else in the world.

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Some things are too important to be taken seriously.

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Everything in moderation, including moderation.


George Demont Otis     Bend in the River

Moderation is a fatal thing. Nothing succeeds like excess.

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To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance.

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Other people are quite dreadful. The only possible society is oneself.

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A truth ceases to be true when more than one person believes in it.

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A writer is someone who has taught his mind to misbehave.

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To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.

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I can resist anything except temptation. [Lady Windermere's Fan]

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I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their intellects. A man can't be too careful in the choice of his enemies.

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It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it.

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Always forgive your enemies-nothing annoys them so much.

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You can never be overdressed or overeducated.

America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between.

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In America the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience.

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By giving us the opinions of the uneducated, journalism keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community.

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Whenever people agree with me I always feel I must be wrong.

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Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative.

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Conversation about the weather is the last refuge of the unimaginative.

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Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.

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Democracy means simply the bludgeoning of the people by the people for the people.

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Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.

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Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

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Experience is one thing you can't get for nothing.

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I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.

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In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane.

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It is through art, and through art only, that we can realize our perfection.

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Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.

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Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation.

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One of the many lessons that one learns in prison is, that things are what they are and will be what they will be.

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One's real life is so often the life that one does not lead.

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Ridicule is the tribute paid to the genius by the mediocrities.

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I am not young enough to know everything.

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Youth is wasted on the young.

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The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything, the young know everything.

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The only thing to do with good advice is to pass it on. It is never of any use to oneself.

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The pure and simple truth is rarely pure and never simple.

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The true mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible.

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Illusion is the first of all pleasures.

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There are only two kinds of people who are really fascinating-people who know absolutely everything, and people who know absolutely nothing.

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I think you are wrong, Basil, but I won't argue with you. It is only the intellectually lost who ever argue.

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There is no necessity to separate the monarch from the mob; all authority is equally bad.

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To be popular one must be a mediocrity.

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Everything popular is wrong.

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Popularity is the one insult I have never suffered.

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The public is wonderfully tolerant. It forgives everything except genius.

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The public has an insatiable curiosity to know everything, except what is worth knowing.

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She...can talk brilliantly upon any subject provided she knows nothing about it.

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There is no sin except stupidity.

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Hear no evil, speak no evil, and you won't be invited to cocktail parties.


George Demont Otis     Green Mountain Nicasio Valley

In old days books were written by men of letters and read by the public. Nowadays books are written by the public and read by nobody.

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A good friend will always stab you in the front.

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I like talking to a brick wall-it's the only thing in the world that never contradicts me!

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There is only one thing in life worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.

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I never put off till tomorrow what I can possibly do - the day after.

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Punctuality is the thief of time

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To expect the unexpected shows a thoroughly modern intellect.

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If you don't get everything you want, think of the things you don't get that you don't want.

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Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.

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A bore is someone who deprives you of solitude without providing you with company.

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It takes great deal of courage to see the world in all its tainted glory, and still to love it.

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Life is never fair, and perhaps it is a good thing for most of us that it is not.

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Behind every exquisite thing that existed, there was something tragic.

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Where there is sorrow, there is holy ground.

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What of Art?
—It is a malady.
—Love?
—An Illusion.
—Religion?
—The fashionable substitute for Belief.
—You are a skeptic.
—Never! Skepticism is the beginning of Faith.
—What are you?
—To define is to limit. [The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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When bankers get together they talk about art. When artists get together, they talk about money.

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The proper basis for marriage is a mutual misunderstanding.

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Long engagements give people the opportunity of finding out each other's character before marriage, which is never advisable.

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I see when men love women. They give them but a little of their lives. But women when they love give everything.

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Woman begins by resisting a man's advances and ends by blocking his retreat.

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Women are never disarmed by compliments. Men always are. That is the difference between the sexes.

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Women love us for our defects. If we have enough of them, they will forgive us everything, even our intellects. [The Picture of Dorian Gray]

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Men always want to be a woman's first love. That is their clumsy vanity. We women have a more subtle instinct about these things. What (women) like is to be a man's last romance.

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Women have a much better time than men in this world; there are far more things forbidden to them.

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Ah! The strength of women comes from the fact that psychology cannot explain us. Men can be analyzed, women...merely adored. [An Ideal Husband]

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Women are made to be loved, not understood.

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Who, being loved, is poor?

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You don't love someone for their looks, or their clothes, or for their fancy car, but because they sing a
song only you can hear.

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Where there is no love there is no understanding.

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If you are not long, I will wait for you all my life.

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I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an ass of yourself.

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Seriousness is the only refuge of the shallow.

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Man is many things, but he is not rational.

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A pessimist is somebody who complains about the noise when opportunity knocks.

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A simile committing suicide is always a depressing spectacle.

The mystery of love is greater than the mystery of death.

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Life has been your art. You have set yourself to music. Your days are your sonnets.

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Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.

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Ordinary riches can be stolen, real riches cannot. In your soul are infinitely precious things that cannot be taken from you.


George Demont Otis     End of Summer's Day

The nicest feeling in the world is to do a good deed anonymously-and have somebody find out.

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The world was my oyster but I used the wrong fork.

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Keep love in your heart. A life without it is like a sunless garden when the flowers are dead. The consciousness of loving and being loved brings a warmth and a richness to life that nothing else can bring.

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Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing. [The Picture of Dorian Gray]

*

Create yourself. Be yourself your poem.


George Bernard Shaw (1856 - 1950) was an Irish playwright, articulate writer/critic of music and literature, and political activist. He wrote more than 60 plays using a scathing wit and incisive humor regarding social problems. He was particularly angered by what he perceived as the exploitation of the working class. He is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize for Literature (1925) and an Oscar (1938 for his contributions to literature and for his work on the film Pygmalion (an adaption of his play of the same name).

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This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap.

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The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends upon the unreasonable man.

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All great truths began as blasphemies.

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You see things and you say "Why?"; but I dream things that never were and I say "Why not?".

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When I was a young man I observed that nine out of ten things I did were failures. I didn't want to be a failure, so I did ten times more work.

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Happiness and beauty are by-products. Folly is the direct pursuit of happiness and beauty.

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This is true joy of life-the being used for a purpose that is recognized by yourself as a mighty one, instead of being a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances, complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy. I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the community, and as long as I live, it is my privilege to do for it what I can.

*

I am giving you examples of the fact that this creature man, who in his own selfish affairs is a coward to the backbone, will fight for an idea like a hero. . . . I tell you, gentlemen, if you can show a man a piece of what he now calls God's work to do, and what he will later call by many new names, you can make him entirely reckless of the consequences to himself personally.

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I tell you that as long as I can conceive something better than myself I cannot be easy unless I am striving to bring it in to existence or clearing the way for it.

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I dread success. To have succeeded is to have finished one's business on earth, like the male spider, who is killed by the female the moment he has succeeded in his courtship. I like a state of continual becoming, with a goal in front and not behind.

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I don't know if there are men on the moon, but if there are they must be using the earth as their lunatic asylum.

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My way of joking is to tell the truth. It's the funniest joke in the world.

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People exaggerate the value of things they haven't got: everybody worships truth and unselfishness because they have no experience with them.

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Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it.

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Democracy is a form of government that substitutes election by the incompetent many for appointment by the corrupt few.

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Virtue consists, not in abstaining from vice, but in not desiring it.

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The test of a man or woman's breeding is how they behave in a quarrel.

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There are two tragedies in life. One is to lose your heart's desire. The other is to gain it.

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Revolutions have never lightened the burden of tyranny: they have only shifted it to another shoulder.

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Never believe anything a writer tells you about himself. A man comes to believe in the end the lies he tells himself about himself.

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People are always blaming their circumstances for what they are. The people who get on in this world are they who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can't find them, make them.

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It is easy - terribly easy - to shake a man's faith in himself. To take advantage of that, to break a man's spirit is devil's work.

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A man who has no office to go to-I don't care who he is-is a trial of which you can have no conception.

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A day's work is a day's work, neither more nor less, and the man who does it needs a day's sustenance, a night's repose, and due leisure, whether he be a painter or ploughman.

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Woman's dearest delight is to wound Man's self-conceit, though Man's dearest delight is to gratify hers.

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Success covers a multitude of blunders.

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He knows nothing; he thinks he knows everything - that clearly points to a political career.

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A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.

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You have learned something. That always feels at first as if you had lost something.

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The secret of being miserable is to have leisure to bother about whether you are happy or not. The cure for it is occupation.

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A pessimist? A man who thinks everybody as nasty as himself, and hates them for it.

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The things most people want to know about are usually none of their business.

*

You don't learn to hold your own in the world by standing on guard, but by attacking, and getting well hammered yourself.

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Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.

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I can't talk religion to a man with bodily hunger in his eyes.

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The more things a man is ashamed of, the more respectable he is.

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Marriage is popular because it combines the maximum of temptation with the maximum of opportunity.

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My advice to you is get married: if you find a good wife you'll be happy; if not, you'll become a philosopher.

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Marriage is an alliance entered into by a man who can't sleep with the window shut, and a woman who can't sleep with the window open.

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The philosopher is Nature's pilot. And there you have our difference: to be in hell is to drift: to be in heaven is to steer.

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When a man wants to murder a tiger he calls it sport: when the tiger wants to murder him he calls it ferocity.

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Money is the most important thing in the world. It represents health, strength, honor, generosity, and beauty as conspicuously as the want of it represents illness, weakness, disgrace, meanness, and ugliness.

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The liar's punishment is not in the least that he is not believed, but that he cannot believe anyone else.

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In Heaven an angel is nobody in particular.

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Everything happens to everybody sooner or later if there is time enough.

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Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience.

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A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.

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We have no more right to consume happiness without producing it than to consume wealth without producing it.

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The worst sin towards our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them; that's the essence of inhumanity.

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Youth is a wonderful thing. What a crime to waste it on children.

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The only man who behaved sensibly was my tailor; he took my measurement anew every time he saw me, while all the rest went on with their old measurements and expected them to fit me.

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Hatred is the coward's revenge for being intimidated.

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No man who is occupied in doing a very difficult thing, and doing it very well, ever loses his self-respect.

*

When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty.

*

Power does not corrupt man; fools, however, if they get into a position of power, corrupt power.

*

Better keep yourself clean and bright; you are the window through which you must see the world.

*

What the world calls originality is only an unaccustomed method of tickling it.

*

If you cannot get rid of the family skeleton, you may as well make it dance.

*

The secret of forgiving everything is to understand nothing.

*

When we know what God is, we shall be gods ourselves.

*

Hell is paved with good intentions, not with bad ones. All men mean well.

*

Life is no brief candle to me. It is a sort of splendid torch which I have got a hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.


George Demont Otis     Flowering Shores

 

 


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